September 12, 2019

**DISCLAIMER!!**

To get the full benefit of this blog, I suggest listening to “Eye of the Tiger”.

Ready? Alright, so this blog is all about POWER!  And the importance of adding power exercises into your training protocol.

We all know what speed is, and we know what strength is, but what exactly is power and why should we care? Power is defined as the ability to exert the maximum force AS FAST AS POSSIBLE. Therefore, we can’t have speed without power. Power is also related to strength.

So why increase the power of our muscles? It’s simple, when training to increase the power of our muscles, we’re training our central nervous system. Just one of the many functions of the central nervous system is to control the movements of the muscles. So, when we are training our central nervous system, say with power exercises, we are training our body to control its own muscles with precision and efficiency. This in turn means, we have better muscle endurance. We end up being able to do more exercises without feeling that muscle fatigue during our workout. This also means there will be less muscle soreness felt after the workout. This might be a hard concept for some people to wrap their head around, as people generally want to feel that muscle soreness after a workout. **As a side note, just because you don’t feel sore, doesn’t mean you didn’t put in the work at the gym, your muscles are just getting more efficient at taking that lactic acid away. **

Will our muscle mass increase and look more muscular when we do power exercises? No, and that is because power exercises use muscle fibers that we already have. Again, power exercises are training the central nervous system, not the actual muscle. Since power exercises don’t “bulk” us up, this makes them ideal to throw into the routine near a race. The increase in power will help with muscle endurance, and the added muscle bulk won’t weigh you down during the race. And if there are no races planned in the near future, power exercises are good to add in anytime.

If you want to add a day of power exercises to a workout routine, all you have to do is drop the weight, increase the amount of repetitions done and do every repetition as quickly as possible. If you find you’re still lagging in the speed, drop the weight some more. Don’t forget to take a break between the sets too! Don’t be afraid to even take a break between each rep if you need to. And if you’re doing a movement quick enough, you may need to take a break.

Here are two categories of power exercises you can try at the gym:

  1. Plyometrics are a group of exercises that promote high movement with a lot of muscle fiber recruitment in a short amount of time. The time when the body comes into contact with the ground needs to be short!

Example: Depth jump

  1. Speed-strength sets: This category of power exercises is when you perform multi-joint, full body lifts as quickly and explosively as possible, but with LIGHTER weight.

Example: Body-weight squat, cable row

There you have it. We now know why power is important (trains your CNS), what power does for our muscles (increases endurance), when do add power into our training protocol (any time or near a race) and different types of power exercises (plyometrics and speed-strength).

 

Now, go try it out and all the power to you! (sorry)

Dylan Crake
Registered Kinesiologist
Registered Massage Therapist

August 29, 2019

Mobility doesn’t equal flexibility.

There I said it.

And static stretching has the potential to worsen an injury, if one is present! So how do we become more mobile? Why do we need mobility? and what even is mobility?

Mobility is about having the ability for joints to move through the full range of motion, with NO pain and ease of movement! It is essentially how you and your body move together. The more mobility you have, the more self-awareness you gain.

And, do you know what happens when you have more self-awareness? You know when something doesn’t feel right, sooner, within your body, such as a possible injury. Mobility means you catch the signs of an injury when it first happens, leading you to get the help you need and stop the pain in its tracks. Isn’t that amazing?!

 

We need to be mobile. Simple as that. We need to be able to move through day-to-day life in order to get from Place A to Place B.  Surprisingly, strength training assists with this. “Hold up !” you might be thinking, “doesn’t increasing strength mean limiting the range of motion of those joints?” No! The stronger the joints, the more control you have over those joints, therefore more mobility you have! Therefore, if you want to get more mobile, get stronger.

Furthermore, when enhancing mobility in our bodies, it is important to do incremental changes. This allows the body to adapt slowly and not go “What the heck are you doing?!?!” when you decided to foam roll your quads for 30 minutes once a week.

 

Everyone benefits from working on their mobility. How do I know this? If you think about it, most people stay within a limited range of motion for the majority of the day (i.e., sitting at a desk). This means you’re essentially missing half of your range of motion at your hips during the day! Also, when most people are moving, they typically move in one direction, I haven’t bumped into anyone (yet) that walks side-to-side. This again, limits our range of motion! The limited range of motion can cause a decrease in the sought, after mobility, leading to faulty movement patterns, which then leads to loss of movement economy, therefore a loss of energy and can make you prone to more injuries! It’s a giant chain reaction.

So, what can you do to increase your mobility? Exercise and massage! The two things I know best. Some simple exercises to add in throughout your day could include:

  • Leg Swings: swing your legs side to side, increasing your hip mobility and getting them to move in a direction they don’t normally move in
  • Frankenstein Walks: Bring your legs up in front of you, with control, while walking, increasing the hip range of motion again, working on balance and proprioception.
  • Walking lunge: Working on that hip range of motion, along with balance and proprioception.
  • Deep-body weight squats: Get down as low as you can without toppling over. This is a great position to be in if you just want to hang out. Watching tv and a commercial comes on? Go into that deep squat, your hips will thank you.
  • Getting up off the ground and going back onto the ground: This is an easy movement you can easily do throughout the day.
  • Hitting the door frame when you walk through a door: This is working on the shoulder mobility, when was the last time you raised your arms above your head.

 

And what about massage?

Start incorporating self-massage with foam rollers, lacrosse balls and a softer balls into your everyday routine.

You can use the foam rollers on larger parts of your body, such as your back and hamstrings. Use the harder lacrosse balls, on more specific areas that are deeper, such as a trigger point in the upper trap and use a softer ball to  work on the connective tissue covering the muscles to get nutrients into the fascia. The forearms are a good place to try that one! Remember to go up incrementally, only do self-massage for about 3 minutes whenever you can fit it in, in your day. This will also better prepare your body for a massage when you see a massage therapist, allowing you to reap the rewards better.

Now, when you go for your massage treatments with a massage therapist (such as myself), please forget the slogan “No pain, no gain”. This is absolutely wrong and no intense pain should be felt during a massage. Increased pain during a massage could cause the opposite effect of the intended results. Making your muscles go into protective mode and making them stiffer than they were before.

So remember:

  • mobility doesn’t mean flexibility
  • strength enhances mobility

And forget:

  • No pain, no gain

And there you have it. Mobility is important in injury prevention, self-awareness, coordination and generally better movement. You can incorporate mobility exercises throughout your day, and it never hurts to see a massage therapist to get your tissue moving!

 

Dylan Crake
R. Kin,
Registered Massage Therapist

 

August 15, 2019

What is periodization?

If you’ve ever wondered what periodization was, and why you hear fitness trainers talk about it, then you’ve come to the right place for a little crash course on the wonderful world of periodization!

To begin, periodization is splitting up different training aspects into different cycles to meet different fitness goals.

The four phases of periodization that I’ll talk about include:

  •  Foundational
  • Hypertrophy
  • Strength
  • Endurance

(there are more than just these phases when it comes to periodization, especially if you are a runner or cyclist, but I’ll be focusing on the above phases specifically)

Now, it’s important to start in the foundation phase, and from there you can move between the three other phases, depending on what you believe your body needs.

Foundational Phase: This is where primal movement patterns are observed and re-built. This is the phase where most of the teaching gets done. If you want to perfect your deadlift, hang out in this phase for a while.

Parameters

Load: 60 % of maximum strength
Sets: 2-3
Repetitions: 12-15
Duration: 2 weeks to forever
Exercises: Hip hinge, squat patterns

 

Hypertrophy Phase: This is where muscle tone and muscle mass are created. When completing exercises in this phase, you want to move slow and controlled. When planning out which exercises you want to complete in this phase, focus on having 80% of the exercises compound (push, pull) and 20 % isolated (tricep pulls, bicep curls). If you want to see results, it is important to do 12-16 working sets of a larger muscle group (quadriceps) in a week  and 6-9 working sets for smaller muscle groups (calf muscles).

Parameters

Load: Moderate weight
Sets: 2-3, with positive fail
Repetitions: 8-12
Rest: 1-2 minutes between sets
Duration: 6- 8 weeks
Exercise: Front squat, Romanian deadlift

 

Strength Phase: This is where your body recruits more muscle fibres by adapting to the demand you impose on your body. The heavier the weight, the more demand on the body and the more the body needs to work to recruit all the muscle fibres. Interestingly enough, this is the phase where people see most weight loss.

Parameters 

Load: Heavy weight
Sets: 3
Repetitions: 2-6
Rest: 2-3 minutes between sets
Duration: 6-8 weeks
Exercises: Bench press, deadlift, front squat

 

Endurance Phase: This is the phase where you will complete as many repetitions as you can in 30 seconds OR you will increase time under tension by holding a position. The endurance phase can help build up cardiovascular strength, allowing your heart to pump more blood out to the body, when needed most.

Parameters

Load: Light weight or body weight
Sets: 3
Time: 20- 30 seconds
Rest: 15-60 seconds This increases time under tension
Duration: 6-8 weeks
Exercises: Burpees, squat hold

 

It’s important to remember that periodization does not have to be linear! You can travel back-and-forth between the phases, allowing your fitness planning to match your life and goals.

Which phase do you want to work in?

Dylan Crake
R. Kin,
Registered Massage Therapist

August 15, 2019

Hey everyone, Cory here! I wanted to take a minute to let you all know about this new tool I’ve added to my tool box. I can’t wait to put this into practice! It’s called Rapid NeuroFascial Reset!

So you’re probably asking..

What is Rapid NeuroFascial Reset?

It is a newer soft tissue movement based therapeutic technique. It addresses the central nervous systems role in alleviating pain, tension and restrictions within muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia and nerves. It works to desensitize and calm hypersensitivity in the nervous system that causes pain. 

Why choose RAPID?

Many clients choose RAPID because of the ‘rapid’ response to treatment. Provides individuals with the chance to return to their regular activities more immediately. Most painful conditions will be resolved in a few treatments.

There are a many conditions that can be remedied by RAPID including:

  • headaches / migraines
  • back pain
  • carpal tunnel syndrome
  • shin splints
  • shoulder pain
  • sciatica
  • plantar fasciitis
  • knee problems
  • tennis / golfers elbow
  • whiplash
  • TMJ
  • frozen shoulder
  • bursitis
  • bunions and arthritic joints

What is it like to receive a RAPID treatment?

Each session of RAPID is usually a combination of examination and treatment. Combining direct tension with specific patient movements treats abnormalities in problem areas. RAPID sessions may be uncomfortable during the movement phase of the treatment. This occurs as the neurological system is being stimulated to restore normal function.

Book a session today and experience more ease of movement so you can get back to enjoying life!!

 

 

 

 

 

Cory Boyd, RMT
Personal Trainer
Graston Technique Provider
Rapid NeuroFascial Reset Provider
Certified Golf Fitness Instructor
Officially Running Out Of Room For Qualifications Guy 😉

 

Authors:
Robert and Sherry Routledge

August 8, 2019

We are free to think and say whatever we’d like. But did you know that your brain is always listening?

Studies by developmental biologists such as Bruce Lipton are showing over and over again that our brains hear what we say. Specifically, that our subconscious mind (the part that ensures we respond exactly how we are programmed) takes our words and beliefs and turns them into our actions.

Speaking from a body and pain perspective, what we believe and tell ourselves has a lot to do with how our injuries resolve!

In the clinic every day I hear people speak about themselves with language that is totally counterproductive to healing. Our beliefs shape our reality. As is such, believing we are broken leads to actions that reflect brokenness.  Which in turn leads to more brokenness, (and – wait for it!) the reinforcement of our belief.

What do you believe that isn’t serving you?

 

About the Author: Jen Wright is an RMT and the owner of Whole Therapy. She is an avid gym-goer and loves to lift heavy stuff.  She sees clients of all ages and stages, especially those who are engaged in bettering themselves.  She believes that pain-free is possible.  For more about Jen, click here.

Posted in Jen's Journey, Wellness by Jen Wright | Tags: ,
July 31, 2019

When you practice yoga, one of the most important purchases is your yoga mat.  The mat can make all the difference in whatever style of yoga that you practice.  You want a mat that is the right fit for your particular style of yoga and your body type.

Due to the popularity of yoga, the yoga mats have also become more solid, textured and higher quality.  In fact, there are many yoga mats available today that are eco-friendly. Eco-friendly mats are much more favorable because they are better for the environment and aren’t made with toxic materials.  

There are many eco-friendly types of yoga mats (thanks to the team at ConsumersAdvocates.Org for putting in the research!)to choose from that can still be comfortable and flexible.   The eco-friendly mats come in cotton, cork, jute and many other durable and eco-friendly materials. 

 

The cheaper, plastic mats are less popular today as we realize discover the negative impact these mats have on the environment and our bodies.  The plastic mats are also filled with toxic materials and the last thing you want is to practice yoga on that kind of mat. 

Now that you know the benefits of an eco-friendly yoga mat, there are a few other things to consider: 

Traction

The traction of the mat you purchase can be very important no matter what type of yoga you practice.  A mat which has some traction is important, but you want to be comfortable when moving. The texture of the mat also determines the traction and a rougher mat is ideal as you advance in your yoga practice.

The Thickness of the Mats

The thickness you want in a mat usually depends on your body type and the kind of yoga you practice.   A thicker mat is better for those of us that have back or any joint paint. It is also typically preferred if you practice a more meditative style of yoga.  The thickness, however, might make it harder to feel the floor. Therefore, it depends on your body type and what’s important to you.

Durability of the Mat

You always want a high-quality mat that will last a long time.  There are plenty of eco-friendly mats as well as other quality mats that can last a long time. It’s worth spending a little more money for a mat that will last you a longer time no matter what style of yoga that you practice.

Sticky vs. Slippery Mats

A stickier mat is usually a better choice for a yoga mat when you are practicing a more advance type of yoga.  A sticky mat makes it easier to keep your alignment correct as well as switching poses. There are many yoga practices that in which you need to stay positioned for minutes at a time and a sticky mat is certainly more preferable.

Length of the Mat

The length of the mat can be important to consider and you want a mat that is at least six inches longer than your actual height.  If you are tall or more than six feet, there are extra-long yoga mats that you can purchase. If you have broad shoulders, and extra-wide yoga mat should give you the extra space that you might need.

You can find the right eco-friendly yoga mat that suits your needs and style of yoga.  Since there are so many high-quality, eco-friendly yoga mats available, you should be able to find a great one that will last a long time and will contribute to saving the environment. 

Posted in Uncategorized, Wellness by Pat Moore
June 20, 2019

Internally, everyone has a web-like band of connective tissue found beneath our skin that consists primarily of collagen. This tissue that is also known as fascia, attaches, stabilizes, encloses, and separates muscles, internal organs, tendons, bones, and joints, and has distinct pathways that run along the back, front and sides of the body. Fascia is responsible for ensuring that our highly complex structure remains contained and positioned appropriately throughout the body. Although we cannot see it, it has everything to do with how well our bodies function.

When fascia is fluid and moving properly, as you can imagine, you are moving properly as well. However, given that it literally surrounds every internal aspect of our bodies, if something happens causing it to harden or constrict, that is where you will start to experience either reduced mobility, altered movement, or even pain. Three main events with fascia result in these side effects, some of which occur over time, while others in situations that are more acute. You could experience an injury or over-stretched fascia, the fascia around your joints could become compressed over time, and/or you could develop adhesions when collagen fibres bond together and form harder, less flexible areas. If you experience any or all of these circumstances, you are likely dealing with side effects of overcompensation by muscle groups, pain in the joints, decreased movement, and/or overall soreness due to restriction.

What is Fascial Stretch?

Fascial Stretch is a unique type of stretching that goes beyond just the muscles to target the fascia as well, while remaining cognisant of the fascial pathways and connections. Understanding these pathways allows one to connect the location of pain with the cause. Most often, where you experience pain/discomfort is not actually the area that needs released. For example, you have a fascial line that runs from the back of your skull all the way down your back, right through to your calfs and ankles, and ends at the base of your feet. Therefore, if you have any restricted fascia in your lower body, you could actually experience pain in your upper body/neck. Alternately, poor posture in your upper body and a tight lower body put tension on the fascia and can result in back pain. Thus, understanding the flow of these pathways and addressing the complete system is critical for obtaining results that last.

Another extremely beneficial aspect of Fascial stretch is that it targets the entire joint and joint capsule. As previously mentioned, fascia is located throughout the joints as well.  In a sense, when this fascia becomes tight it essentially results in “fusing” of the joint, decreased mobility, overcompensation by the muscles, and ultimately aches and pains. With Fascial Stretch, the use of traction removes these restrictions and stimulates lubrication within the joint.

Fascial Stretch is an incredibly gentle and passive technique that allows you and your body to relax completely while still getting full benefit of the treatment. In a smooth and slow motion, the practitioner guides each joint in the body through varying planes of movement to restore maximum range of motion. There is no pain, not even discomfort. While therapeutic results remain highly individualized and depend on each case, research demonstrates that it significantly helps those who did not respond to other treatments.

Who Would Benefit From Fascial Stretch?

Fascial Stretch is beneficial for absolutely everyone. Whether you train hard, sit for long periods, or have gradually developed changes in movement over time, fascial stretch can help. In combination with massage, it lengthens and loosens tension and is a fantastic compliment that drastically speeds up results. Alternatively, applying this technique as a stand-alone treatment for the entire session will have you walking away feeling less restricted, with reduced pain, and moving in ways you forgot you could.

Cory Boyd

Registered Massage Therapist
Personal Trainer
Certified Golf Fitness Instructor

cory.wholetherapy@gmail.com

March 13, 2019

When spring hits after the freezing cold weather of winter, a big realization sets in. The perfect swing you mastered from last summer has left you once again. As you rotate through the changing seasons, this becomes an unfortunate reality every year, leaving you to start from the beginning as each golf season commences. It leaves you wondering whether you can do something to avoid being stuck in this continuous pattern, and improve every year rather than breaking even. Well guess what, the answer is YES!

 

To be well prepared upon return of the off-season, it is important to take care of your physical self. Training year round is critical for golfers to identify and correct any physical limitations, thus developing a solid foundation of mobility and stability.  This is necessary for optimum strength, which reflects in improved speed and power. Being physically prepared will allow you to play the most consistent, enjoyable, injury-free golf of your life.

Given that the golf swing requires a unique combination of motions, keeping flexibility and strength over the winter can be the key to a good start when golf season returns. Unfortunately, all too often there is a lack of activity and mobility during winter, which results in reduced range of motion/fluidity in your swing, and decreased strength. Therefore, it is pertinent to have a game plan to ensure that both these factors remain in place. A regular routine consisting of massage therapy and exercise is critical to maintaining consistency in your game. When appropriate massage therapy is applied, there is the obvious effect of relaxed muscles and improved flexibility/fluidity. However, the benefits extend much further and include enhanced golf performance, eliminating pain, reduced risk of injury, and more efficient/accelerated recovery from activity and/or injury. Combining massage therapy with a proper exercise program provides the strength, stability, and power required to not only maintain, but improve your performance as well. Without a doubt, both practices are critical to returning to the course in April with your best foot forward as opposed to rebuilding your swing all over again.

As previously mentioned, the game of golf is highly complex, involving significant strategy, skill, and technique. Therefore, reviewing, analyzing, changing, and practicing your set-up (grip, stance, posture, ball position and alignment) is just as important. Unfortunately, too many golfers fail to address the off-season as a time of growth and development, and fall into the same trap of inactivity and lack of practice. To avoid finding yourself in this category, focus on one or two key improvement priorities that are most likely to help you return to the course in spring with more skill and confidence. The following are common issues affecting a golfer’s game that one should keep in mind for practice during downtime:

  1. Poor golf posture: A proper golf posture is the foundation for a consistent and powerful golf swing. Without proper physical preparation (i.e. strength and stability), maintaining a proper golf posture is difficult.

 

  1. Stiffness, immobility and/ or pain in the golf swing: People most often neglect and/or do not fully address this limitation during the off-season. As a result, this lack of flexibility and reduced range of motion is the primary cause of golf-related injuries early in the season.  The golf swing is a very dynamic and complex movement that can put a great deal of strain on the body if not properly prepared.

 

  1. Early fatigue: If you walk the course, golf rounds can last up to 5 hours.  Without adequate endurance, early fatigue can lead to poor performance, frustration, additional injuries from lack of form, and overall lack of enjoyment.

 

As you can see, the off-season is the ideal time to make positive changes to your game through the maintenance/improvement of flexibility, strength, and stamina, as well as the progression and enhancement of your skills to ensure your return to the game is enjoyable, rewarding, and leaves you excited about your performance.

 

Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions or thoughts!  I look forward to hearing from you soon!

Cory Boyd
Registered Massage Therapist
Personal Trainer
Certified Golf Fitness Instructor

 

Posted in Massage Therapy, Uncategorized, Wellness by Pat Moore | Tags: , , ,
November 30, 2018

Trying to motivate yourself to run throughout the winter months can be a struggle, but trying to stay injury free while you run throughout the winter months can be even more of a challenge! Check out these winter running tips that should help keep you running consistently all year long without pesky injuries slowing you down!

 

Temporarily reduce your weekly mileage with the first snowfall.

When you are running on snow as opposed to a hard, slip free surface you are using stabilizing muscles you haven’t used in a long time. This places you at increased risk of injury. Week 1 run 50% of your normal weekly mileage. Week 2 increase to 75%. By week 3 you should be able to return to your normal weekly mileage.

Avoid switching to the treadmill for 100% of your winter running.

First of all running on a flat uniform surface involves repeating the exact same movement over and over again which increases your risk of repetitive strain injuries like achilles tendonitis and plantar fasciitis.  Second of all when the snow melts and you switch back to running outdoors you will have to drastically decrease your mileage or you’ll risk injury. Running on the treadmill does not mimic running outside! The impact force from running outside is much greater than on the treadmill. Also on the treadmill you are trying to keep up with the track as it glides under your feet, whereas outside you actually have to propel yourself forward. It’s very different therefore your body needs to be allowed the time to adjust!

Make sure your important stabilizing muscles are strong!

Running on the snow and ice demands more muscle effort than running on the treadmill or outdoors on dry pavement. Especially from the glutes and core. (See previous glute strengthening blog!)

Wear the proper footwear!

Yaktrax

Either wear sneakers that are meant for winter running and have soles with studs or spikes, or purchase an ice traction device such as Yaktrax that fit over your sneakers.

Warm up!

Warming up is more important during the cold winter months. If you are standing in a parking lot waiting for others in your group to show and you are shivering and chilly, your muscles are tight and cold as you start to run which can put you at increased risk of injury. Jog on the spot, do high knees or bum kicks, or wait in your car with your heat blasting!

Ignore the pace on your watch!

Focus on effort level as opposed to pace if you are used to running with a running watch. You will run slower in the winter months. If you try to maintain the same pace you did on the clear dry pavement you could end up with an injury. Use the rate of perceived exertion scale. Perceived exertion is how hard you feel your body is working. These feelings are not objective like monitoring your heart rate, but they can give an estimate of your heart rate and your exercise intensity zone.

 

 

 

Try snowshoe running!

It’s a great way to get outdoors and enjoy the snow covered trails. You have to make some small technique adjustments such as running with a slightly wider stance and lifting your feet higher. This will challenge your hip abductors such as your glute med and min and your hip flexors so make sure you ease into snowshoe running gradually. It is much slower than road/trail running so don’t focus on pace. Again use the rate of perceived exertion scale above! Also, purchasing snowshoes that are designed for running such as the Atlas snowshoes shown below can definitely improve your comfort level and speed while snowshoe running.

 

November 12, 2018

 

The main goal of an initial assessment is to determine possible causes of your injury or impairment. We also ask: What can we do to remove or alleviate the pain?

One thing to keep in mind is that sometimes, you may be a bit sore after an assessment.  This is largely due to the fact that we’ve probably just moved your body in ways you’ve been avoiding due to discomfort or pain.  In order to determine a course of action, we as therapists trust in functional movement assessment techniques to help us get you back to the best version of yourselves as quickly as possible!

Physiotherapy Assessment

 

What to Expect

  • Our initial assessments typically consist of a 1 hour one-on-one session with a therapist, and 99 percent of the time, treatment will be provided on the first visit as well.

 

  • The therapist will review your health history as well as pose a series of helpful “red flag” questions with the purpose of eliminating any sinister causes as the root of your injury/impairment.

 

  • Expect to move!  Our bodies were designed to do so and chances are, you’re here to figure out what is keeping you from pain free movement.

 

  • It’s always a good idea to come dressed in non-restrictive clothing so that when a therapist is assessing your squat for example, you’re not going to be doing so in a suit or skirt.

 

  • If you have any diagnostic imaging available to you (x-ray, MRI), we will be happy to have a look at that with you.

 

  • Homework is probably going to be assigned.  Getting you back to feeling great will require your active participation and expectations will be set out for you by your therapist.  We are always available by phone or email if you ever have any questions or need clarification on what your homework is.

The initial assessment is the first step in getting you back in action.  Just remember, we want to see you as little as possible, but as much as necessary to get and keep you pain-free and functioning well.