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January 7, 2020

This experience was amazing!! If you ever have the opportunity to be in the presence of Jen Wright, it is a blessing. Not only is Jen a colleague, she is also my boss and what a warrior of a person she is! In our treatment today, I got to experience craniosacral therapy for the first time and she also included some energy and neuromuscular work in the treatment and…wow! I am completely grounded and at peace as I write this now. I am not one to flaunt my knowledge of energy work, I’m not a practiced energy worker myself nor I’ll admit, do I understand all the wonderful benefits of how it can be integrated into a therapeutic treatment, but my goodness has Jen ever mastered it! She explained that everyone experiences these types of treatments differently and I was fortunate enough to have the most blissful treatment EVER!

Raise your hand (go on, I’l be able to tell!) if you’ve said or heard someone say “If I’m not in tears by the end of this treatment then the massage is unless” – WRONG! The body doesn’t need to feel pain to relieve pain. Massage therapy is a delicate balance between challenging tissue in a therapeutic way and then integrating healing techniques to relax and release the targeted tissue. Jen IS that balance, and she throws in an added bonus of working through the emotional walls that our bodies put up consciously or even unconsciously. She is not fluffy or voodooey at all, she explains the process through scientific facts, anatomical physiology and how it all ties together with massage and craniosacral work. Whether you are a spiritual butterfly or a science forward person, she allows you to see things through your own beliefs and interpretations and I believe that’s what sets her apart from the rest.

For myself, I had a very empowering treatment that allowed me to see where my strengths and weaknesses are. We worked through muscle trigger points in my back to grounding my feet and protecting my inner healer. We also worked on the skull to see where things are moving with ease or are slightly “stickier”. I was able to leave this treatment feeling rejuvenated and at peace. I believe everyone should feel this way, rejuvenated and at one with oneself. Life can be extremely overwhelming at times and there are moments when we need to look inward to heal to move forward. 

Jen is the founder and creator of Whole Therapy. She understood that it was not about the money but how we as practitioners can help heal others as a team, as a whole. I would highly recommend, if you can find a spot in her busy schedule, that you experience a treatment with her healing hands. They are completely magical!



Stephanie Lanthier
RMT

December 18, 2019

As soon as the word acupuncture is said, a lot of people’s initial thoughts are needles, sh*t!” Myself included. I am not a fan of needles, shots or giving blood. With this in mind, you better believe that my experience was quite interesting to say the least. I was challenging myself to get over a small fear of needles by getting dry needling and acupuncture done. As a massage therapist, our forearms muscles can get quite angry with us as we are constantly treating clients day in and day out. So I thought it would be a great idea to give this modality a try and Adam, Physiotherapist extraordinaire, and my co-worker over at our Lancaster, was the perfect person to reach out to. 

 Adam is tremendously knowledgeable in his field and has this great way of making you feel comfortable with the uncomfortable. Right from the beginning of the session, he was putting me at ease by explaining the process step by step. He explained each part of the process thoroughly to make sure I was okay to proceed with acupuncture. He showed me the needles that he would use and demonstrated on the physio table and allowed me to see how incredibly gentle these needles are. From here I felt ready and excited to get the treatment started. We were going to try both acupuncture and dry needling techniques!

These two techniques felt very different from one another. With the dry needling, I felt a build up of anticipation as I was waiting for the “twitch” to happen. It was startling at first but then I became accustomed to the feeling. Following the treatment, my muscles felt stiff but the following day my forearm felt 10 times better! Whereas with the acupuncture, it felt more irritating (to me) at the very least. This technique was definitely less “twitchy” and much more subtle. Although, the awareness you have of the needle breaking the skin’s surface and then staying there brings its own sensations. During my experience, I had an acupuncture needle in the crease of my thumb and first finger. It was itchy at the beginning then a cold flush went through my hand and things calmed down completely after that. 

Both acupuncture and dry needling are very similar in terms of the needles being used used but also very different in the way these techniques are executed. Personally, I preferred the dry needling technique as it targeted my trigger points/knots within the muscle that needed attention versus the acupuncture that is used in Traditional Chinese Medicine more for pain relief and for bringing blood to the area of discomfort/injury. I would recommend acupuncture for anyone struggling with an acute/sub-acute injury that has become painful to move and that would benefit from blood flow to the area.

If you’re curious to try it out and see if it is a good option to include in your personal wellness formula, please come out to visit Adam at the Lancaster Whole Therapy! His years of experience, soothing nature, and strong communication skills make treatments with him a breeze.

 



Stephanie Lanthier
RMT

Posted in #TrySomethingNew, Uncategorized by Pat Moore
December 4, 2019

My experience with Richelle was really eye opening to say the least. If you think about it, our first steps ever as babies start a little wobbly but once we get our feet moving there is no stopping us. As toddlers we are always being chased after, always moving, always running. As we get older some of us keep running but not all of us have sought to understand the proper technique to running. I know I definitely did not!

Ottawa, Running, RMT, Stephanie LanthierAs a teenager, I developed shin splints and was told to run on the balls of my feet but I was never taught the true reason behind it. After having Richelle assess my running today, I am truly enlightened! It’s such a natural thing, running that I think we all sort of take it for granted, and think that we instinctively just  know how to do it properly. So what’s happening to a lot of us, if we don’t jog/run/move properly, we are teaching our bodies to compensate.  And when we compensate, we weaken other areas and cause imbalances. If these imbalances become our new normal, we become more prone to injury. Don’t get me wrong, cardio is cardio and it’s not everybody’s favourite, but if we were all taught how to jog properly and run without hurting ourselves or sore in the following days, don’t you think you we’d all enjoy it more?

 

Now, I do enjoy jogging. I would jog outside all year round if snow and ice wasn’t a hazard for me. It was always nice to jog but I was never consistent with it, and after Richelle brought some things to my attention today, I’ve gained a bit of clarity as to why. As I write this, I realize the way that  I was running always felt “heavy”. What I mean by this, and as Richelle mentions in my first video, I jog with an excessive vertical oscillation (up/down movement) which made me expend more energy than what is efficient. Not only was I losing more energy due to the vertical oscillation, I felt 10X more heavy on my feet. That realization on its own makes me look at running with a whole new perspective. Who wants to feel like an elephant rumbling along when you can feel like a gazelle floating through the air?! Sign me up!! The small adjustment we made to my technique changed everything! Such a minor change, this one detail, has motivated me to start back up again with the running. And it gives me the confidence that I’ll be doing it more efficiently, and with a lesser chance of injuring myself now that I’m not forcing my body to compensate!

Richelle has a way of listening to your story and assessing your form that really motivate you towards achieving your goals, fine tuning your technique to get you where you want to be. She gave me the awareness and education that I needed to bring my jogging to the next level and not only did she provide me the tools, she gave me types of running that may peak my interests and be a better fit for me.  (I am a very competitive individual and I love a challenge!) I mentioned that I can get bored easily so she suggested trail running during the warmer seasons and snowshoe running during the winter season, saying that these types of running may provide me with a challenge, a challenge that will fill the boredom and spark the individual competitiveness inside me that I am seeking. Can’t wait to try these out!

Her brightness and passion for running truly shows and it has pushed me to a place where it makes me want to grow myself as a person, especially in terms of starting back up with the running. That’s true empowerment 101!! That’s not something you can teach someone and it is totally captivating!

I have a newfound respect for running and appreciation for those that do it well! But we can learn! And if we can be educated on something like jogging and running, that opens the door to learning about how to improve ourselves overall in terms of wellness.

If you’ve experience pain while running or are just interested, like myself, in what you can do to improve your running, Richelle is your girl!

Check out her page on Facebook, Running With Richelle here!

And don’t forget to follow  my page on Facebook as well! 



Stephanie Lanthier
RMT

Posted in #TrySomethingNew, Uncategorized by Pat Moore | Tags: , ,
November 6, 2019

Massage Therapy OttawaAre you feeling sluggish, perhaps run down? Is that seasonal slump hitting you? Yep, you guessed it.

Winter Is Coming

Self care is KEY during the winter season! Longer nights and shorter days means less vitamin D and sun rays.  At this time of year, it is crucial to step up our self care game, and I am here to help you take a step in the right direction!

One option for combating the SAD’s  (seasonal affective disorder) is meditation. 

We have 2 systems in our body: the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS). The SNS is our “flight or fight” system where we are constantly stimulated and always go go go. Where as our PNS is our “rest and digest”. When we find ourselves “stuck” in  fight or flight mode, this can put our systems in to a state overdrive or even burn out!  A lot of this can be attributed to SADS and seasonal stress!!  Meditation can certainly help calm an overly stimulated SNS system and with the longer nights and shorter days ahead, what better time than to take advantage of the darkness and meditate?! 

During the winter season things can get stressful!! Christmas is right around the corner and everyone is trying to meet deadlines for the new year. I also definitely don’t see anyone outside in the snow “catching rays”.

Start by taking 20 minutes out of your daily routine and try out some belly breathing exercises. TRY taking nice big deep belly breaths and focusing on inhaling for 3 seconds and exhaling for 3 seconds.

It doesn’t need to be fancy. Have a seat in a favorite chair, sit on the ground with your legs crossed or even lay down flat on a yoga mat. The idea is that you take time to relax and think inwards, focusing on what is going on in your body. Can you feel where you hold all your stress? Are you allowing your jaw to un-clench and eyebrows to relax? 

** Keep in mind – if you are resting your eyes, trying to meditate and all you can think of is the work that you haven’t finished, maybe meditation is not for you. 

If meditation is really not your cup of tea, booking  a massage is really the next best thing (who am I kidding… it’s definitely the best thing ever!)  Massage Therapy brings a multitude of benefits to your systems, but 3 key points that are crucial during this seasonal slump.

  • Massage increases your PNS, which is the “rest and digest” system. Aka the belly gurgles or falling asleep during your treatment. It allows you to feel more rested and turns off your sympathetic system that may always seem to be firing on all cylinders.  
  • Massage decreases levels of cortisol in the body. Bye bye stress! 
  • Massage increases the levels of dopamine and serotonin in the body. These neurotransmitters in the brain help balance your mood. OH HAPPY DAYS!!

Whether its at home or in a treatment room at Whole Therapy, these are all things our systems need during this gloomy time of the year. Self care allows us to stabilize, take a much needed deep breath, and balance our bodies to prevent imbalances such as burn out or seasonal slumps. Try it out at home with some meditation or stretching and if it’s not cutting it, come on in and book a massage. It’s time to take care of our bodies, as we only have one to live in.


Stephanie Lanthier
RMT

 

August 15, 2019

Hey everyone, Cory here! I wanted to take a minute to let you all know about this new tool I’ve added to my tool box. I can’t wait to put this into practice! It’s called Rapid NeuroFascial Reset!

So you’re probably asking..

What is Rapid NeuroFascial Reset?

It is a newer soft tissue movement based therapeutic technique. It addresses the central nervous systems role in alleviating pain, tension and restrictions within muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia and nerves. It works to desensitize and calm hypersensitivity in the nervous system that causes pain. 

Why choose RAPID?

Many clients choose RAPID because of the ‘rapid’ response to treatment. Provides individuals with the chance to return to their regular activities more immediately. Most painful conditions will be resolved in a few treatments.

There are a many conditions that can be remedied by RAPID including:

  • headaches / migraines
  • back pain
  • carpal tunnel syndrome
  • shin splints
  • shoulder pain
  • sciatica
  • plantar fasciitis
  • knee problems
  • tennis / golfers elbow
  • whiplash
  • TMJ
  • frozen shoulder
  • bursitis
  • bunions and arthritic joints

What is it like to receive a RAPID treatment?

Each session of RAPID is usually a combination of examination and treatment. Combining direct tension with specific patient movements treats abnormalities in problem areas. RAPID sessions may be uncomfortable during the movement phase of the treatment. This occurs as the neurological system is being stimulated to restore normal function.

Book a session today and experience more ease of movement so you can get back to enjoying life!!

 

 

 

 

 

Cory Boyd, RMT
Personal Trainer
Graston Technique Provider
Rapid NeuroFascial Reset Provider
Certified Golf Fitness Instructor
Officially Running Out Of Room For Qualifications Guy 😉

 

Authors:
Robert and Sherry Routledge

July 18, 2019

Hi ladies and gents, Cory here.

I’m happy to say that I’m now a fully certified Graston technique provider!  Some of you may be wondering..

What is The Graston Technique?

The Graston Technique was developed over 20 years ago when a patient was not satisfied with the rehabilitation regimen suggested to him following surgery.  Recovery was taking too long and was not providing him with the range of motion he was looking for. In search for a better option, he began researching and consulting with a number of medical industry professionals. Through this process, he established a set of stainless steel tools to help break down the scar tissue that was limiting his mobility. He created six different instruments, all uniquely designed for specific areas of the body to encourage faster and more effective healing. The techniques used to apply these tools promotes overall health and wellness, and is now known as The Graston Technique. It is an excellent, evidence-based, non-invasive healing method for those wishing to reduce acute, chronic, and post-surgical pain.

 

When you suffer from a strained muscle, or a pulled ligament or tendon, the soft tissues experience trauma. This can result in scar tissue developing around these structures, which then causes restrictions and reduced mobility as the surrounding fascia tightens up. Therefore, the focus of The Graston Technique is to break down this scar tissue and fascia and ultimately freeing everything up to move the way it was designed. When applied correctly, patients see a notable difference in reduced pain and increased function.

One of the unique elements of The Graston instruments is that they enhance the clinician’s ability to detect adhesions, scar tissue, and/or restrictions in the affected areas. An initial step to the technique is to run one of the tools over the area. During this process, it “catches” on fibrotic tissue. As the restricted areas immediately appear red in colour relative to the other surrounding areas, the practitioner knows that those areas are what need attention. Once the practitioner identifies the proper location, he/she uses the specific instrument(s) for that area to break up the scar tissue, which the body then absorbs. What makes The Graston Technique so effective is that it treats the area from multiple directions to accommodate for any irregular formation of scar tissue.  During this process, temporary inflammation in triggered, which is incredibly beneficial for the injury, as it increases the rate and amount of blood flow, and initiates the healing process of the affected tissues.  Therefore, when applied correctly, The Graston Technique promotes the body to heal itself.  So not only is it a fantastic treatment for decreasing pain and improving mobilization for acute and chronic muscle tightness, it also improves your range of motion and decreases delayed muscle soreness, making it the preferred treatment for many major sports teams.

 

As just mentioned, The Graston Technique can treat multiple types of pain, in both acute and chronic stages. Patients with the following diagnoses make excellent candidates for this type of treatment:

  • Tendinopathies (all the conditions that end in -osis or -itis, such as Achilles tendinitis, medial/lateral epicondylitis and greater trochanteric bursitis)
  • Fascial syndromes (such as trigger finger, plantar fasciitis, ITB syndrome)
  • Ligament pain syndromes (such as ankle sprains or other types of sprains)
  • Edema/swelling reduction
  • Post-surgical or traumatic scars/adhesions
  • Entrapment syndromes (carpal/tarsal tunnel, ulnar entrapment, thoracic outlet).

Benefits of The Graston Technique include:

  • Breaks up and releases any adhesions, resulting in decreased pain
  • Reduced scar tissue
  • Increased mobility
  • Decreased back & neck pain
  • Sports injury relief
  • Repetitive work injury relief
  • Decreases migraines & headaches

Possible risks and complications are quite minimal when using this technique, and the side effects generally only last for1-2 days, but most patients experience the following in the treated areas:

  • Bruising
  • Soreness
  • Redness

Over the 20 years since its discovery, The Graston Technique has become one of the most sought after treatments for all individuals. Regardless of the type and severity of the pain experienced, this approach is so effective that patients rarely walk away without noticing significant benefits. If pain is something you are currently experiencing, or have been experiencing for some time now, this treatment could be the answer you are looking for.

 

Cory Boyd, RMT
Graston Technique Provider

Posted in Massage Therapy by Cory Boyd | Tags: , ,
June 27, 2019

Hi! My name is Dylan and I’m addicted to school.  Ok not really, but I did recently graduate from my third post-secondary institution. Apart from gaining two degrees and an advanced diploma, I’ve gained a lot of knowledge along the way.

Johnston Hall – University of Guelph

I attended the University of Guelph, where I completed my B.Sc in Human Kinetics. There, I learned about the human body and had the opportunity to study in the cadaver lab, giving me a real-life glimpse of the human body and the ability to actually SEE what the muscles are doing during movement. I also learned that I LOVED physics. Imagine my surprise when I found out biomechanics was a thing and it was essentially physics for the human body!! I also wanted to give back to the community, so I became a volunteer exercise assistant at a health centre, where I assisted with exercises for older adults. Moreover, during my last year at Guelph, I did a fourth-year project where I researched fall prevention and older adults. My volunteering and my project fueled my passion for research and hands-on learning even more.

After my four years in Guelph, I wanted to research some more into the world of biomechanics. The next stop on my educational journey was completing my M. Sc at the University of Ottawa.  My research was focused on looking at older adults and how they adjust to sit-to-stands at varying levels of fatigue. But I learned so much more than that. During my time at U of O, I learned perseverance, accountability and initiative. I preserved from writing through all the different edits of my thesis, I was held accountable for my research when it was not going as planned, and I took initiative to reach out and contact those who could help me. I may have gained a degree from that school, but more importantly, I grew as a person there. And I discovered, post-graduate degrees were not for me. To my family’s relief, I was not planning on doing my PhD- Thanks to all my family and friends that I made walk up 7 plus flights of stairs to make my thesis happen!

Apart from completing my Masters, I believed it was a good idea to become a Registered Kinesiologist (R. Kin.) as well. So, I spent one winter studying for the registration exam, reading endless textbooks and memorizing the attachment points of muscles – Again!  I became a R. Kin. in the summer of 2015 and was lucky enough to have found a job working as one!  In that role, I was able to use my research in a practical setting. I was able to help people pre and post orthopaedic surgery, help patients manage pain, and help decrease arthritic flare-ups, all through the power of movement and exercise! Helping these patients, just through exercise, made me want to do more and that’s when I went back to school, for the third time, to become a Registered Massage Therapist.

I  have recently graduated from Algonquin College in the Massage therapy program, and the things I learned there were amazing. Apart from learning how to massage, I learned time management skills and the importance of maintaining boundaries. I learned that college was a different kind of hard. Almost like a fun challenge that made you also want to pull all your hair out.  Maybe most importantly, I learned  that I was going down the correct career path and I’m ecstatic on how well massage compliments my skills as a kinesiologist.

So, what does this all mean? Whole Therapy is lucky to have gained a (soon-to-be) RMT and a Registered Kinesiologist, who has years of experience in the fields of movement and exercise. Not only will my RMT touch help to ease pain and increase range of motion of a joint, but my R. Kin. eyes will be able to look at your movements as a human being and come close to pin pointing what needs to be worked on.

 

My name is Dylan, and I’m a life-long learner and a two-for-one therapist.

Dylan Crake
Registered Kinesiologist
and soon to be Registered Massage Therapist!

June 20, 2019

Internally, everyone has a web-like band of connective tissue found beneath our skin that consists primarily of collagen. This tissue that is also known as fascia, attaches, stabilizes, encloses, and separates muscles, internal organs, tendons, bones, and joints, and has distinct pathways that run along the back, front and sides of the body. Fascia is responsible for ensuring that our highly complex structure remains contained and positioned appropriately throughout the body. Although we cannot see it, it has everything to do with how well our bodies function.

When fascia is fluid and moving properly, as you can imagine, you are moving properly as well. However, given that it literally surrounds every internal aspect of our bodies, if something happens causing it to harden or constrict, that is where you will start to experience either reduced mobility, altered movement, or even pain. Three main events with fascia result in these side effects, some of which occur over time, while others in situations that are more acute. You could experience an injury or over-stretched fascia, the fascia around your joints could become compressed over time, and/or you could develop adhesions when collagen fibres bond together and form harder, less flexible areas. If you experience any or all of these circumstances, you are likely dealing with side effects of overcompensation by muscle groups, pain in the joints, decreased movement, and/or overall soreness due to restriction.

What is Fascial Stretch?

Fascial Stretch is a unique type of stretching that goes beyond just the muscles to target the fascia as well, while remaining cognisant of the fascial pathways and connections. Understanding these pathways allows one to connect the location of pain with the cause. Most often, where you experience pain/discomfort is not actually the area that needs released. For example, you have a fascial line that runs from the back of your skull all the way down your back, right through to your calfs and ankles, and ends at the base of your feet. Therefore, if you have any restricted fascia in your lower body, you could actually experience pain in your upper body/neck. Alternately, poor posture in your upper body and a tight lower body put tension on the fascia and can result in back pain. Thus, understanding the flow of these pathways and addressing the complete system is critical for obtaining results that last.

Another extremely beneficial aspect of Fascial stretch is that it targets the entire joint and joint capsule. As previously mentioned, fascia is located throughout the joints as well.  In a sense, when this fascia becomes tight it essentially results in “fusing” of the joint, decreased mobility, overcompensation by the muscles, and ultimately aches and pains. With Fascial Stretch, the use of traction removes these restrictions and stimulates lubrication within the joint.

Fascial Stretch is an incredibly gentle and passive technique that allows you and your body to relax completely while still getting full benefit of the treatment. In a smooth and slow motion, the practitioner guides each joint in the body through varying planes of movement to restore maximum range of motion. There is no pain, not even discomfort. While therapeutic results remain highly individualized and depend on each case, research demonstrates that it significantly helps those who did not respond to other treatments.

Who Would Benefit From Fascial Stretch?

Fascial Stretch is beneficial for absolutely everyone. Whether you train hard, sit for long periods, or have gradually developed changes in movement over time, fascial stretch can help. In combination with massage, it lengthens and loosens tension and is a fantastic compliment that drastically speeds up results. Alternatively, applying this technique as a stand-alone treatment for the entire session will have you walking away feeling less restricted, with reduced pain, and moving in ways you forgot you could.

Cory Boyd

Registered Massage Therapist
Personal Trainer
Certified Golf Fitness Instructor

cory.wholetherapy@gmail.com

March 13, 2019

When spring hits after the freezing cold weather of winter, a big realization sets in. The perfect swing you mastered from last summer has left you once again. As you rotate through the changing seasons, this becomes an unfortunate reality every year, leaving you to start from the beginning as each golf season commences. It leaves you wondering whether you can do something to avoid being stuck in this continuous pattern, and improve every year rather than breaking even. Well guess what, the answer is YES!

 

To be well prepared upon return of the off-season, it is important to take care of your physical self. Training year round is critical for golfers to identify and correct any physical limitations, thus developing a solid foundation of mobility and stability.  This is necessary for optimum strength, which reflects in improved speed and power. Being physically prepared will allow you to play the most consistent, enjoyable, injury-free golf of your life.

Given that the golf swing requires a unique combination of motions, keeping flexibility and strength over the winter can be the key to a good start when golf season returns. Unfortunately, all too often there is a lack of activity and mobility during winter, which results in reduced range of motion/fluidity in your swing, and decreased strength. Therefore, it is pertinent to have a game plan to ensure that both these factors remain in place. A regular routine consisting of massage therapy and exercise is critical to maintaining consistency in your game. When appropriate massage therapy is applied, there is the obvious effect of relaxed muscles and improved flexibility/fluidity. However, the benefits extend much further and include enhanced golf performance, eliminating pain, reduced risk of injury, and more efficient/accelerated recovery from activity and/or injury. Combining massage therapy with a proper exercise program provides the strength, stability, and power required to not only maintain, but improve your performance as well. Without a doubt, both practices are critical to returning to the course in April with your best foot forward as opposed to rebuilding your swing all over again.

As previously mentioned, the game of golf is highly complex, involving significant strategy, skill, and technique. Therefore, reviewing, analyzing, changing, and practicing your set-up (grip, stance, posture, ball position and alignment) is just as important. Unfortunately, too many golfers fail to address the off-season as a time of growth and development, and fall into the same trap of inactivity and lack of practice. To avoid finding yourself in this category, focus on one or two key improvement priorities that are most likely to help you return to the course in spring with more skill and confidence. The following are common issues affecting a golfer’s game that one should keep in mind for practice during downtime:

  1. Poor golf posture: A proper golf posture is the foundation for a consistent and powerful golf swing. Without proper physical preparation (i.e. strength and stability), maintaining a proper golf posture is difficult.

 

  1. Stiffness, immobility and/ or pain in the golf swing: People most often neglect and/or do not fully address this limitation during the off-season. As a result, this lack of flexibility and reduced range of motion is the primary cause of golf-related injuries early in the season.  The golf swing is a very dynamic and complex movement that can put a great deal of strain on the body if not properly prepared.

 

  1. Early fatigue: If you walk the course, golf rounds can last up to 5 hours.  Without adequate endurance, early fatigue can lead to poor performance, frustration, additional injuries from lack of form, and overall lack of enjoyment.

 

As you can see, the off-season is the ideal time to make positive changes to your game through the maintenance/improvement of flexibility, strength, and stamina, as well as the progression and enhancement of your skills to ensure your return to the game is enjoyable, rewarding, and leaves you excited about your performance.

 

Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions or thoughts!  I look forward to hearing from you soon!

Cory Boyd
Registered Massage Therapist
Personal Trainer
Certified Golf Fitness Instructor

 

Posted in Massage Therapy, Uncategorized, Wellness by Pat Moore | Tags: , , ,
October 31, 2017

Getting a massage can be both therapeutic and relaxing. Massage allows for time to unplug, tune in, take some time for yourself. And if you’re lucky enough to have a therapist that knows their stuff, you have the added bonus of fixing stuff while you’re there.

That being said, there are things you can do to make the massage experience better. Ready?

  1. Breathe

After the therapist has left the room and you are comfortable on the table, take the time to breathe. Not just normal breathing, but the deep belly-breathing kind. Focus on expanding your belly and filling your lungs. This will help calm you down, reduce your heart rate, and tune you in to what your body is saying.

Once the massage is in session, breathe if things get painful; this helps to release tight muscles and sore spots. Holding your breath will actually make the pain worse. Think of a labouring woman – she needs to breathe through painful contractions, and so should you.

  1. Communicate

You need to tell your therapist if the pressure is too much…or too little. As aware as therapists are to client’s bodies, we can’t always tell if you are in pain. Some people are great at showing it, some aren’t. But it may not even be pain that you are in, it could be as simple as you just like lighter pressure than what we are currently giving. Remember that they can’t feel what you are feeling. Communicating what you enjoy allows the RMT to treat you more confidently and lets you leave feeling your best.

  1. Tell us to SHUT UP

Therapists often get in a mode of talking with certain clients because that’s what we have always done with said client. So when you say “I just want to relax today,” we don’t necessarily think you mean your brain as well. So tell us to shut up! We are ok with it, I promise.

 

  1. Unplug

Ever notice how your fingers itch to check your phone if you hear a beep? Distracting. Turn off your phone so you don’t hear when a message comes in; this will help keep you in the space where your body needs you to be at that moment.

 

  1. See us regularly

Funny how your body hurts less when you see someone to treat all your finicky stuff regularly, eh? Seeing a RMT on a maintenance schedule can actually decrease your chance of injury and help prevent flare ups of pain.

BONUS!

  1. Be on time

Seems like a no-brainer, but being on time is a big deal. If you are on time to your appointment, we have ample time to treat what you need done and don’t have to rush through it. This will also help you feeling better longer. Plus there is nothing worse than being frazzled because you are late. As we said, massage is therapeutic, but if done right, it should also be a relatively relaxing experience.

 

Ready to book your massage at Whole Therapy? Give us a call!

Melissa Beals is an RMT with Whole Therapy. Melissa works extensively with athletes of all levels with a goal in mind to increase their athletic performance through education and understanding of their bodies. See more about Melissa here.