Tag: Physiotherapy

February 25, 2016

Q:  How do you feel about massaging women?IMG_3313

A:  Most of my clients are women. I feel that I’m able to give a good, therapeutic, intuitive massage. I’m not judgmental of women’s bodies; I treat all of my clients with the respect they deserve.

Q:  And how about massaging men?

A:  In my experience, men who ask for a male therapist usually want deeper tissue massage, which is great for me because that’s what I like to do! Deep tissue focuses on the therapeutic aspect of massage. It’s a major part of what I do.

Q:  What are your feelings about being a gender minority in the massage world?

A:  I look at my job from the perspective of a massage therapist, not from that of a man. Unfortunately, massage therapy is still confused with intimacy, which it is not. It’s assessment, it’s treatment of soft tissue injuries. It’s an hour on the table working on your muscles. It’s therapy. Your therapists sex has nothing to do with it.

Q:  What would you say you focus on during treatments?

A:  Pain is often what brings clients in.  I always address pain first – it’s a symptom that shouldn’t be ignored. Once the pain goes away, I focus on function.  If the body isn’t functioning well, pain is always around the corner.

September 4, 2015

Dictionary.com defines change as the following:

CHANGE
verb (used with object), changed, changing.

To make the form, nature, content, future course, etc., of (something)
different from what it is or from what it would be if left alone:
To change one’s name; to change one’s opinion;

To change the course of history. 

trapped

Not sure if this office setup has the lumbar support I need..

What a simple, easy to understand, straight to the point definition.  And yet, as simple as it is to understand, why then do we humans have so much trouble implementing change into our own lives?
I’m not talking about changing the tires on your car, or, the vacuum bag, or your little human’s diapers; although some of these things are dull, taxing, or unpleasant.  I’m talking about real change.  Meaningful life-altering change.

Four years ago I found myself in a terrible position.  I was stuck in a dead end job with no further room for growth.  I wasn’t learning any new skills or even really developing my current skill set.  The monetary compensation was less than adequate, and I was oh, so very bored.  I can look at that time now and easily identify these symptoms for what they were:  I was stuck.  I needed a career transplant.

I was trapped in this Grand Canyon-sized rut where it became easier to do nothing than to fix my situation. I had absolutely no idea how to get out of it.  I was walled in and (thought) I didn’t have the tools to get myself out.

But everyone has a boiling point, don’t they?  Everyone will eventually find themselves in a position where change becomes inevitable.  And sometimes, all it takes to initiate that change is a little luck, a little timing, and a little pro-activity.   Jamie, a co-worker of mine at the time, knew of my struggles with the daily grind and had often been a sounding board for me when I had to let off steam.  Jamie turned out to be the husband of my current employer, the incomparable Jen Wright.

Taking action, finally

Combine the fact I had recently returned to high school to obtain my diploma after a 17 year hiatus (that’s a change story for another time) with an increasing difference of opinion on certain matters with some of my co-workers led to me investigate a suggested employment agency here in the city. I set up the appointment to meet with someone in a fancy downtown office; I took their online office skills test, and went for the follow up meeting on a Friday after work.  I was told that they would be in touch with me and that was that.

It was the following Monday when Jamie stepped into my office and said to me.  “Jenny is looking to hire an office manager, are you interested?”  Boom.  All of a sudden, I had a lifeline.  It was like Regis had just given me an extra phone a friend and I was about to become a millionaire.

The next week when the employment agency called, I happily told them I had found what I was looking for and that their services would not be needed.

I don’t normally put a lot of stock in Karma or that kind of thing, but I can honestly tell you that I believe the only reason that the offer came my way was because I had taken the first step and had unknowingly asked the universe to give me the change I needed.

sea creature

“Try the Human, it’s delicious”

The reason people have trouble with change is because, not surprisingly, it’s really hard.

It’s like jumping into a lake you’ve never swam in before.

You know that moment when you’re standing on the dock, imagining all the hideous and murderous monsters that are right now swimming just below the surface?  That’s how change can feel.  Scary.  Scary, slimy and covered  in murder-y scales.

Change is difficult for me because I like things to be consistent.

Everything in their place and all that. The big win for me was learning to realize that things were broken and out of place.  It took me a long time, but I did it.

When I finally realized that I couldn’t keep doing things the way I’d been doing them, the universe responded with a giant “Well it’s about time.  Here, take this happiness and meaning.  Have a good day” and vaporized all the sea mutants waiting below the surface.

So yes, change is difficult.  But is it essential to survival?  Yes.  Is it one of the keys to happiness?  Probably.  Have and will I continue to look for opportunities to evolve?  Certainly.

 

We at Whole Therapy want to hear from YOU! Take a picture or write a post about your #ChangeOneThing experience. Don’t forget to use the hashtag #WholeTherapy as well. We’ve got some great prizes to give away!

 

Pat Moore is the office manager at Whole Therapy.  Pat works alongside a team of dedicated professionals and is here to help ensure that your visit at Whole Therapy is as pleasant as possible.  For more about Pat, click here!

Pat

July 29, 2015

Life is like a Spartan Race. No, seriously. Let me explain. On June 5, 2015 I participated in the annual Spartan Sprint at Edelweiss Ski Resort. Being a relatively fit individual, I felt I was pretty prepared for the upcoming 5 km obstacle course race. Spartan was to be conquered and I was going to be the conqueror. I was so confident that my plan was to yell “SPARTA” at the top of my lungs using a deep Gerard Butler-like voice while performing air kicks victoriously over the finish line.

Why was I so foolishly confident?

 Three days a week I work out across at the gym doing some form of weight training at the discretion of my trainer. I run three days a week with a good friend of mine for at least a distance of 5km. I also play beach volleyball in a league every Wednesday night. I like to think I am a fairly active person. I can squat, lunge, jump, sprint, burpee, crawl, climb, push and pull.

Spartan had nothing on me, right? Well, here’s the thing about the Spartan Race. You have to run UP the ski-hill at Edelweiss TWICE. Emphasis on the word, UP. Ski hills are not meant to be run UP, they are meant to be skied DOWN. The ascension up the mountain literally kicked my ass!! I was not used to keeping my heart rate so elevated. This resulted in nausea and feelings of pukey-ness. Not a great start for this aspiring conqueror. Let’s just say I cursed gravity quite a bit during this pesky obstacle course!

 

So alas, here are 3 life lessons I learned (or, probably already knew but effectively ignored) while completing the Spartan Sprint.

spartan race 2015 bails

  1. No matter how prepared you feel you might be, sometimes you just aren’t. That’s life. And it’s ok! You can’t be prepared ALL the time. Sometimes you need to get your ass-kicked to remind you that there is still work to be done.
  1. Sometimes winning is just seeing it through. Instead of me yelling “SPARTA” at the top of my lungs while performing air kicks victoriously over the finish line, I hauled my tired, muddy butt over the finish line in a zombie, pain-induced state. But I finished, and it was AWESOME!
  1. You’re better than you think you are. Although the mountain kicked my butt, the obstacles did not. The obstacles actually served as a much needed break from running UP the ski-hill. And the feeling of being strong is one of the best feelings EVER. Just check out my game face captured in this photo of me after I dominated the gymnast-like rings. Clearly I was high-fiving myself in my mind! My body is capable, and that’s pretty cool!

 

Bailey Gresham is a registered physiotherapist for Whole Therapy. She specializes in manual therapy and movement-based therapy. She likes bridging the gap between rehabilitation and performance training.  More about Bailey here.

Bailey

 

June 18, 2015

In April I had the opportunity to speak at a Women’s Business Network breakfast, and I spoke about a topic that I deem extremely important.  Read on to find out how to start listening to the language of your body.

Your body is great.  I’ve said this before in another blog post, and I mean it.

Listening to the language your body speaks enables you to give it what it needs.  When you respect your body’s needs, you can nourish it in the right ways, and be healthier, more functional, and overall happier with life.

Too often we ignore the little signals our bodies give us.  Headache?  Just pop a pill.  Tired?  Just one more hour on the computer.  Stiff?  Ignore the discomfort, it’ll eventually go away, right?

Nope.  The body has the amazing ability to speak to you louder and louder until you get the message.  Eventually, it will make you pay attention, even if it has to shut you down with extreme pain or limitation.
outoforderWhen learning to listen, it’s vital that we deem ourselves important enough.  If we don’t, we’ll never understand our body’s language because that would mean we’d have to listen!  Many people get by on “good enough” but is that really okay?  Would “good enough” be an adequate health status for our children?  Our significant others?  No way!  Would you drive a vehicle every day that was only “good enough?”  Probably not.

And yet we “drive” our bodies around in that state all too often.  You are important.  Make sure you know that.  Because “good enough” within our own selves does not lead to greatness in our family lives, our relationships, or our businesses.

So how do I know what my body has to say?  Here are the steps to follow:

Tune In.dog-food-meditating-dog-medium-18624

What is your body saying?  Start simple.  How is your temperature right now?  I ask my clients this before every massage, and it tunes them in right away.  Too warm? Sweaty?  Chilly under a vent?  Just perfect?  Take a second and tune in to what your body feels about temperature.

Then, move on to discomfort.  Start from your head and work down to your toes.  Are you uncomfortable anywhere?  Are you extra aware of one side of your neck versus the other?  Are you sitting in a way that’s making your back hurt?  Are your knees creaky?  Discomfort and pain are often ignored because we feel we don’t have the time for them.  However, to paraphrase an oft-used quote, Those who think they have no time to deal with discomfort will sooner or later have to find time to deal with injury.

Once you have tuned in to your body’s sensations like cold/hot, hunger/satisfaction, or discomfort/pain, you’re on the right track.  Sensations are important because they connect you to what your body needs right now.

 

For use elsewhere.00_01_35_02.Still021

Honest assessments to get to the root of the issue.

Assess.  Why am I feeling this way?  It’s important that you assess without judging too much (it’s hard, I know).  Judging can lead to runaway emotions and turn small problems into big ones.

For example: The sensation of being too hot can lead to annoyance – I hate having these hot flashes! Stupid body!  Instead of judging, ASSESS: do you notice that they happen more often when you’re stressed?  More often in the morning? Can you see a pattern?  If you can, you’re closer to understanding your body’s language, and it can help with your emotional response.

The sensation of pain or discomfort can lead to anxiety – what’s wrong with me? Is this serious? Is it just a headache or something worse? Instead of judging, ASSESS: Why is my head hurting?  Am I dehydrated?  Have I been staring at this screen too long?  Did I sleep funny?  Asking simple questions can sometimes reassure you when it comes to pain.

 

takeaction

“Action always beats intention”

Take Action:  Now that you’ve discerned what your body is trying to tell you (or you’re on track), you need to take action.  It’s important not to tell your body to “shut up.”  Eventually, your body will make you listen, even if it has to shut you down in the process.

If you don’t know what action to take, that’s okay.  Asking for help is perfectly fine.  My colleagues and I help people learn to interpret their body’s language every day.  It’s a process of trial and error.  But you have to take some action, or nothing will happen at all.

If, while practicing, frustration creeps in, remember that’s normal.  We all want instant gratification:  I want my body to just be good! I want there to be no pain or discomfort!

Well I want my business to make a million dollars this year, and I want my kids to pick up their clothes without me asking a million times… but it doesn’t just happen!

You have to learn how to ask if you want results.  Learning to speak back to your body is as important as listening to it speak to you.  We’re not going to live healthy into our eighties by eating crappy food and being sedentary.  When we eat crappy food, we’re telling our bodies “Here, this is your fuel.”  When we exercise, we’re telling our bodies, “Get used to this; adapt; be stronger.”  By comparison, if you tell your body, “this computer posture is normal” eight hours a day, your body will adapt to that!

Remember that you are speaking to your body as much as it is speaking to you.  You can get help learning to listen to your body’s language, but for the most part, it just takes practice and perseverance, and an intuition that I know we all have (we are women after all!).

To recap: In order to be better at listening to the language of your body, first, TUNE IN to the physical sensations and the emotions that your body is presenting to you.  Tune in often.  Scan your body often.

Second, ASSESS why your body is speaking to you.  Why am I feeling this way?  If you can’t figure it out, ask for help.

And third, TAKE ACTION when your body speaks to you.  Take action in a timely manner, and use intuition as your guide.

Remember: even though it might not always feel like it, your body is great.  It’s great.  And it’s talking to you.  Make sure you listen.

Jen Wright is an RMT and the owner of Whole Therapy. She is an avid gym-goer and loves to lift heavy stuff.  She sees clients of all ages and stages, especially those who are engaged in bettering themselves.  She believes that pain-free is possible.  For more about Jen, click here.

Jen

April 29, 2015

It is the last weekend of April and as you know, the theme of April is “Letting Go”. I thought it would be a great opportunity to talk about some of my bad habits because physiotherapists are people too! In the spirit of starting fresh this coming May, here are some of MY bad habits which some of you may relate too! And try not to hold them against me! Haha

1) Chewing my nails. Disgusting, I know. I don’t even know I’m doing it. I’m pretty sure I chewed my nails in the womb, that’s how bad this habit is. Have I tried to quit? Yes. Have I been successful? Not even a little bit. So if anyone has any suggestions on how to quit, leave a comment!

What have I tried? Well my parents offered me $1000.nail biting meme00 to quit for a whole 12 months when I was much younger. I was able to go about 8 months before my nerves got the best of me. I was participating in a cross-country race in The Grove located in my hometown of Arnprior, ON. Fortunately (or, unfortunately) I won the race, but lost the war when it came to my nails. It just took one race and my nails were GONE! I have also tried using that disgusting stuff that makes your nails taste terrible, and guess what? I got USED to the taste and just kept on biting. Biting and biting and BITING. Now, I have no nerve endings left in my fingers for me to even feel pain! Talk about hopeless!

2) Slouching. Ironically, I’m the self-proclaimed posture police when it comes to my clients. I’m especially strict when it comes to my clients who sit at a desk all day! Slouching can lead to loads of dysfunction in your neck and shoulders. Take my shoulder for instance: My poor right shoulder has been getting quite “ouchie” over the last few months. This is because I tend to sit/stand with my shoulders in a forward, rounded position. I am also right hand dominant, making me more inclined to use my right hand for essentially EVERYTHING. Because my shoulders have been creeping forward, the back of my right shoulder has gotten pathologically tight. As a result, my ability to put my hand behind my back is restricted and painful. Overhead movements can be often uncomfortable.

Thankfully, I work with a great team who is able to help me restore my passive accessory movement back to normal. Even though I’m a physiotherapist, sometimes you just need another set of eyes and hands to help resolve some of your issues!

3) Don’t wait! Procrastinate now! Take this post for instance: My boss likes me to post things every Wednesday morning. Heaven forbid I try to have something written BEFORE Wednesday! I like to think I thrive under the pressure of having a deadline. Realistically though, instead of “thriving” I often find myself stressed! There is enough stress in the world without procrastination. My goal in May is to try and set aside some time each day to do something productive (i.e. study for my Level 3 Manual Therapy Course). A half hour is nothing in the grand scheme of things. Maybe my goal should be to de-activate Pinterest? I’m sure I’d get a lot of my life back after doing that!

Keeping it real everyone! With the warm weather approaching, now is the time to make those much needed changes to better yourself! I’m going to try, so should you!

Bailey Gresham is a registered physiotherapist for Whole Therapy. She specializes in manual therapy and movement-based therapy. She likes bridging the gap between rehabilitation and performance training and has really really REALLY short nails.  More about Bailey here.

Bailey

 

April 20, 2015

I’m staring at my feet.  I’ve been staring at my feet for the last two minutes, trying not to distract myself.  My feet are planted into my vibrant purple yoga mat.  My knees are bent just a little, and my upper body is flopped over, my arms hanging down by my feet.

Context starts to creep in: wow, I really need a pedicure.  How long have I been in this pose? Sounds like that baby outside is pretty unhappy…

No.  I give my head a teeny shake to empty my mind of chatter. I focus on the exquisite sensation in the back of my legs. Breathe in: focus on tension.  Breathe out: let tension go.  I repeat this breathing pattern until I feel the rigidity in my hamstrings start to slacken. Ahhh.  But I still need a pedicure.

Becoming a yoga instructor was not something I thought would ever happen, but here I am, three days into Yin training, learning the (y)ins and outs of poses such as Rag Doll, Hero, and Smiling Cow Face (yes, seriously).

smiling_cow

“This grass is udderly delightful”

 

Why am I here?  The first time I tried Yin yoga was during my first foray into running, and my hips were tighter than the lid of a pickle jar.  I sought relief from the discomfort in my body.  Now, almost ten years later, I seek relief from the discomfort in my mind.

Like many people I know, I’ve gotten used to being distracted by the context – while driving to work I seek distraction from the radio.  While waiting for anything (even sometimes a pot of water to boil) I seek distraction in my phone, with texting, emails, or social media.

I’ve forgotten how to focus on what my Instructor calls The Essence.

When we allow our minds to focus inward, we are able to listen to the language our body is speaking to us.  A tight muscle here, a wayward emotion there, maybe even a genius idea budding in the corner of our mind.  If we are constantly entertaining ourselves with outside noise, we miss all of the wonderful things our insides are trying to tell us.

So I’m feeling the feelings.  Tension is melting away at the base of my neck as my head hangs upside down.  My chest and stomach feel wonderfully heavy against my thighs now, when at minute one my hips resisted that position.  Breathe in: focus on tension.  Breathe out: let tension go.

Will I ever be able to be fully mindful and poised? I have my doubts.  But I’m open to learning.  In the meantime, I’m using my body to train my mind, and I’m open to possibility.

The journey continues.

Jen Wright is an RMT and the owner of Whole Therapy. She is an avid gym-goer and loves to lift heavy stuff.  She sees clients of all ages and stages, especially those who are engaged in bettering themselves.  She believes that pain-free is possible.  For more about Jen, click here.

Jen

April 17, 2015

So the theme of April at Whole Therapy is “letting go.” I struggled with coming up with a blog topic to compliment this theme. This past week, however, I came across this article on the web and thought to myself, Eureka!  This is my teachable, “letting go” moment!

I want to preface by saying that medical imaging technology has developed into something amazing. The amount of stuff we can see without actually cutting into the body is phenomenal. Sounds morbid, I know, but it’s true! Medical imaging can be very valuable in identifying serious medical conditions such as fractures, dislocations, etc. That being said, it is often difficult to discern what findings on imaging are related to natural aging processes or rather a pain-provoking injury? Words like arthritis, degenerative discs, disc bulges, tendon tears all sound very scary! And the fact that they sound scary is a problem in itself. They can create fear- a lot of fear. But, what if I told you that the above are all minor findings and do not really add much value to your plan of care?

Confused? Let me clarify. Mrs. A came to see me at the clinic for a “MRIdisc herniation.” On my subjective intake, I asked Mrs. A about her pain. Mrs. A had NO PAIN. Confused, I asked Mrs. A about her ability to perform her day-to-day activities. Mrs. A had NO DIFFICULTIES performing any of her day-to-day activities. Now very confused, I asked Mrs. A about this suspected “disc herniation.” Mrs. A had a hysterectomy in which she had some complications. She had to undergo repeat CT Scans to make sure all was well and healing appropriately. It just so happened that a disc bulge was seen as an incidental finding on one of these CT scans. Nervous about this finding, Mrs. A sought out physiotherapy to treat her disc herniation, for which she had no pain, no loss of function and for all purposes, NO impairment!

The fact is, arthritis, degenerative discs, disc bulges and tendon tears are usually just a natural result of aging against gravity. Don’t believe me? Check out this recent article (2015!) summarizing a cross-sectional study looking at abnormal findings on MRI in the cervical spine (a.k.a. neck) in 1211 asymptomatic people (a.k.a. NONE of the 1211 people had ANY neck pain). You can find it here: http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/25584950\

Three things you should know about neck imaging:

  1. Everyone has disc bulges. This study found that 87.6% of the 1211 had disc bulges and no neck pain. So for every 10 people, 8.76 of them have disc bulges! And remember, none of these people had any pain!
  2. You even have disc bulges in your 20s. They found that 73.3% and 78.0% of males and females in their 20s had disc bulging. Yep, even your 20 something co-worker who barely seems out of the womb probably has a disc bulge.
  3. A small percentage of people even have spinal cord compression and no pain! Sounds unbelievable eh? But 5.3% of people, generally over the age of 50, had evidence of spinal cord compression with no pain. That’s not to say that the compression shouldn’t be monitored, but it goes to show you that the perception of pain is a lot more complicated then we may give it credit for!

Pain in itself is a complicated construct. I’m not trying to undermine anyone’s pain experience, but it is important to recognize that the scary-sounding results on imaging may not be so scary at all. Giving these words power over your life, however, has been shown to lead to more doctor’s visits, more pain, more disability, and a poorer quality of life. The only way to overcome this is to let go of the power we give these words and understand that they are probably just a natural result of aging! Don’t worry, you’re going to be just fine!

Bailey Gresham is a registered physiotherapist for Whole Therapy. She specializes in manual therapy and movement-based therapy. She likes bridging the gap between rehabilitation and performance training.  More about Bailey here.

Bailey

 

 

 

 

 

April 8, 2015

shin splints

If you have been reading my blog, my goal was to initially complete a series on needling in the profession of physiotherapy. Don’t worry folks, I still plan on completing that series! It’s just on pause for now. I have chosen to stray from my previous plan and look at a common problem that plagues many runners, because as we all know, April showers bring May flowers, and a boat-load of running injuries! Also, my boss wanted me to do a blog on running. Since she is of course, my BOSS, I figured I should make like a good employee and write about shin splints!

Shin splints is a funny diagnosis. It’s a funny diagnosis because shin splints is typically used as a catch-all term to describe shin pain. In fact, shin splints is defined by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons as “pain along the inner edge of the shinbone (tibia)”. So in a nut shell, shin splints = shin pain. This makes its diagnosis confusing. Imagine this typical made-up conversation:

              Hello doctor, I have pain in the inner, lower portion of my legs after running.

              That is easy! You have shin splints!

              Oh, that answers EVERYTHING. I have shin splints!

But I just told you that shin splints = shin pain. See the problem here? Shin splints doesn’t actually tell me what’s causing your pain! Here are three reasons you may develop shin pain, also known as the notorious shin splints.

1) Medial tibial stress syndrome. This is also known as “too much, too soon” syndrome. MTSS is typically the result of overloading the tibia with biomechanical inefficiencies. This can lead to periostitis, an inflammation of the membrane (a.k.a. periosteum) covering the bone. Ever wonder why it feels like your bone is bruised? Muscular imbalances commonly seen in the tibialis anterior, tibialis posterior and soleus muscle in combination with excessive pronation often puts too much stress on that poor tibia bone. As a result, the tibia bends and bows more than it should. This pulls on the connective tissue attaching to the bone itself. More pulling = more inflammation = more periostitis = more pain. Addressing the biomechanical inefficiencies while decreasing excessive load is key in making sure this bad guy goes away! It usually presents as a dull, diffuse ache along the bone of the tibia.

2) Compartment syndrome. Compartment syndrome is the compression of nerves, blood vessels, and muscles inside a closed space, or compartment, surrounded by a sheet of fascia. There are four different compartments in the lower leg. In order to understand compartment syndrome, you need to understand the role of fascia. Fascia is connective tissue, which attaches, stabilizes, encloses, and separates muscles and other internal organs. It is literally EVERYWHERE in the body. It also does not like to expand very much. As a result, if a compartment in the lower leg swells beyond the stretching capability of the fascia, pressure inside the compartment can increase and increase, and INCREASE. This is serious and can cause tissue death due to the compression of blood vessels (lack of oxygen). If you are experiencing extreme tightness, burning, pins and needles and/or temporary paralysis with running, PLEASE STOP and seek a medical opinion!

3) Tibial stress fracture. A stress fracture is exactly what it sounds like, a fracture or crack in the bone. It is the consequence of the tibia failing mechanically due to repetitive submaximal stress. It is also known as “too much, too soon, too late” syndrome. But Bailey, I’m only running. This is a submaximal stress! How can I get a fracture?! Well, repetitive submaximal stress can cause an imbalance in your body’s ability to resorb bone and form bone. In this case, there is more bone resorption then formation. So even the smallest, most microscopic crack in a bone can progress and worsen under repetitive, submaximal stress. With tibial stress fractures, a runner will experience very localized tenderness directly on the bone. You may even feel a bony anomaly under your finger. Unlike MTSS, you will probably experience pain immediately when you start running in a very point-specific spot. If you suspect a fracture, PLEASE STOP and seek a medical opinion!

Bailey Gresham is a registered physiotherapist for Whole Therapy. She specializes in manual therapy and movement-based therapy. She likes bridging the gap between rehabilitation and performance training.  More about Bailey here.

Bailey

 

 

 

March 25, 2015

AcupunctureSorry for my absence on Whole Therapy’s social media for all of my devout followers (If you are reading this at all, THANK YOU very much!). I was in Cuba for a WHOLE WEEK vacationing from thinking. I’m back though and ready to educate poison all of your minds!

It’s Wednesday and I’ve noticed that I’ve been performing a lot more needling techniques over the last week (with quite a bit of success!). This has inspired me. I feel like writing a series of blogs on the use of needling techniques in the practice of physiotherapy. Today’s goal is to clarify some misconceptions I commonly see in the public’s eyes. In future posts, I’ll look at its utility as an adjunct therapy, because contrary to what some of my client’s might think, I do not enjoy stabbing people with needles just for the fun of it (I will NEVER admit that the masochistic side of me loves seeing that angry, little hypertonic muscle twitch, wink wink).

So here is blog 1 of my needling series!

  1. First of all, I am NOT an acupuncturist. I am a registered physiotherapist who has taken extensive post-graduate course work in order to implement needling techniques as an adjunct therapy in my practice. What does this mean? This means I treat musculoskeletal injuries using acupuncture. I am NOT qualified to treat infertility, digestive issues, silence your nagging spouse, etc using acupuncture. That is outside the scope of practice for physiotherapists. For those types of health concerns, you need to go see a Doctor of Chinese Medicine or your family doctor.
  1. If you’re not an acupuncturist, why are YOU allowed to perform acupuncture then? Physiotherapists who have been trained in Canada now undergo six years of intense training in human anatomy and physiology. Six LONG years! Therefore, the Regulated Health Profession Act (RHPA) provides physiotherapists the authority to perform needling techniques provided we complete the appropriate post-graduate course work to use needling safely (even MORE training). What does this mean? The Regulated Health Profession Act has complete confidence in our ability to use acupuncture. This is because we KNOW the human body. We are little encyclopedias of bones and muscles. We’re pretty much obsessed with the human body (on the cusp of being neurotic). Rest assure, we are knowledgeable and safe!
  1. What schooling do physiotherapists need to take in order to perform acupuncture? There are many post-graduate courses that offer training in acupuncture. I completed two acupuncture and dry needling series with Meridian Health Education (total of 5 courses). Other notable programs include McMaster University’s Acupuncture Program, the Advanced Physical Education Institute, Ontario College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, etc. Feel free to enquire as to what your therapist’s educational background is with regards to needling. It is also the law to roster with the Ontario College of Physiotherapists. This means that if you search us up on our Regulatory College website, it shows that we are rostered to perform acupuncture (and the College knows about it). This is really important! If we do not roster, we can get into big trouble! It’s the public’s right to know that our regulatory body is aware of the skills we are qualified to do. And if your therapist isn’t rostered, STOP. They may not have the expertise we pride ourselves on having (BAD, BAD, BAD).

Bailey Gresham is a registered physiotherapist for Whole Therapy. She specializes in manual therapy and movement-based therapy. She likes bridging the gap between rehabilitation and performance training.  More about Bailey here.

Bailey

February 25, 2015

So you’ve gone and hurt yourself, huh?  You’re a gung-ho weekend warrior with a twinge in your back and aren’t sure what to do about it.  This isn’t unusual.

We get all kinds of people coming through our doors who’ve injured themselves in brilliant and creative ways.

As I sit here compiling this literary masterpiece, a client walks in with back spasms that are causing him visible discomfort.  “How’d that happen?” I say.  “I was choking on some long grain rice and coughed so violently that I threw my back out” he replies.  Believe me when I say we’ve seen and heard it all.  You may find yourself asking “What kind of treatment am I supposed to get?”  With all the various types of sprains and strains you may be unlucky enough to receive, where to start can be an overwhelming decision.   Here are a few things to consider:

“Yer aff yer heid!”

1.What is your level of pain?

If you’ve got a full-scale broken back, you’re going to want the emergency room and not deep tissue massage.  An honest evaluation of the pain you are in/damage you have done is important at this stage.  Open wound?  Hospital.  Arm dangling at a weird angle where you KNOW there isn’t a joint?  Hospital.  Tightness in the lower back after trying the caber toss for the first time?  Whole Therapy!  While our therapists are often told that they have magic hands, they cannot perform lifesaving surgeries or repair broken bones.  We’ve had people come in to see us that could barely move let alone stand being touched or physically manipulated in any way.  Not being a hero at this point and seeking medical attention is best.  On the reverse side of the coin, going and waiting in an ER for 10 hours only to have a Dr. tell you to see a physiotherapist isn’t a lot of fun either.

It can be tricky sometimes to gauge the type of potential damage that may have been done after you landed on your back in the middle of the Rideau Canal whilst distracted by that delicious Beaver Tail in your hands. We get that.  While it’s always best to err on the side of caution, be realistic.  The hospital staff won’t thank you either for taking up their time with a minor scrape or the proverbial bobo.

Now that you’ve determined you don’t require immediate medical attention, you’re looking for some pain relief, rehabilitation, and a plan of action for your recovery.  The next step is to..

2. Consider the type of injury.

Chances are, if you’ve rolled your ankle you’re going to want a more rehabilitative and active treatment; most likely a visit with our physiotherapist, or our chiropractors.  If you feel the situation is more muscle or tissue related, you could also consider our team of massage therapists.

One of the great things about our multi-disciplinary approach is how perfectly our services complement each other.  We often have clients come in for “the double”.  This usually consists of a massage treatment to soften you up followed by a chiropractic adjustment to straighten you out!   We also double up on the physio and acupuncture fairly often.  Perhaps the most effective combination of all though, is the combination of our minds.  Each practitioner here will view things in a slightly different way as their training and expertise dictates.  It’s common practice amongst them to pick each other’s’ brains for answers to tricky questions involving your rehabilitation.  It’s this collaboration upon which the Whole Therapy philosophy is based.

3. What can I afford?

Another thing to consider when booking an appointment is your insurance coverage.  Many of you will have private insurance that allows for some spending on different types of clinical services.  Maybe you’ve got coverage for physiotherapy but not chiropractic.  Perhaps it’s the other way around.  Perhaps you’ve only got coverage for one type of service or perhaps you’ve got everything under the sun covered.  It’s worth finding out before you call in so that we can better serve your budget AND your needs.  That being said, sometimes your maintenance program will continue after your benefits have expired.  Don’t worry.  We want to see you as little as possible but as much as necessary.  That means finding out together what a maintenance plan looks like for you.  The initial treatment and following few appointments will likely be closer together, but as you progress from injured to pain-free to functional, the frequency with which you attend will likely decrease. Benefits are wonderful in that they can mitigate the cost of rehab, but they should not dictate the extent of your rehab.  Consider this.

So don’t worry.  Hurting yourself happens, whether it be from coughing up rice, tossing around cabers, or falling while skating.  We’ve seen it all, remember?

Hopefully this information helps you figure out where to start.  If you’re still stumped, give me a call. We can figure out together how to get the ball rolling.

Pat Moore is the office manager at Whole Therapy.  Pat works alongside a team of dedicated professionals and is here to help ensure that your visit at Whole Therapy is as pleasant as possible.  For more about Pat, click here!

Pat