December 4, 2019

My experience with Richelle was really eye opening to say the least. If you think about it, our first steps ever as babies start a little wobbly but once we get our feet moving there is no stopping us. As toddlers we are always being chased after, always moving, always running. As we get older some of us keep running but not all of us have sought to understand the proper technique to running. I know I definitely did not!

Ottawa, Running, RMT, Stephanie LanthierAs a teenager, I developed shin splints and was told to run on the balls of my feet but I was never taught the true reason behind it. After having Richelle assess my running today, I am truly enlightened! It’s such a natural thing, running that I think we all sort of take it for granted, and think that we instinctively just  know how to do it properly. So what’s happening to a lot of us, if we don’t jog/run/move properly, we are teaching our bodies to compensate.  And when we compensate, we weaken other areas and cause imbalances. If these imbalances become our new normal, we become more prone to injury. Don’t get me wrong, cardio is cardio and it’s not everybody’s favourite, but if we were all taught how to jog properly and run without hurting ourselves or sore in the following days, don’t you think you we’d all enjoy it more?

 

Now, I do enjoy jogging. I would jog outside all year round if snow and ice wasn’t a hazard for me. It was always nice to jog but I was never consistent with it, and after Richelle brought some things to my attention today, I’ve gained a bit of clarity as to why. As I write this, I realize the way that  I was running always felt “heavy”. What I mean by this, and as Richelle mentions in my first video, I jog with an excessive vertical oscillation (up/down movement) which made me expend more energy than what is efficient. Not only was I losing more energy due to the vertical oscillation, I felt 10X more heavy on my feet. That realization on its own makes me look at running with a whole new perspective. Who wants to feel like an elephant rumbling along when you can feel like a gazelle floating through the air?! Sign me up!! The small adjustment we made to my technique changed everything! Such a minor change, this one detail, has motivated me to start back up again with the running. And it gives me the confidence that I’ll be doing it more efficiently, and with a lesser chance of injuring myself now that I’m not forcing my body to compensate!

Richelle has a way of listening to your story and assessing your form that really motivate you towards achieving your goals, fine tuning your technique to get you where you want to be. She gave me the awareness and education that I needed to bring my jogging to the next level and not only did she provide me the tools, she gave me types of running that may peak my interests and be a better fit for me.  (I am a very competitive individual and I love a challenge!) I mentioned that I can get bored easily so she suggested trail running during the warmer seasons and snowshoe running during the winter season, saying that these types of running may provide me with a challenge, a challenge that will fill the boredom and spark the individual competitiveness inside me that I am seeking. Can’t wait to try these out!

Her brightness and passion for running truly shows and it has pushed me to a place where it makes me want to grow myself as a person, especially in terms of starting back up with the running. That’s true empowerment 101!! That’s not something you can teach someone and it is totally captivating!

I have a newfound respect for running and appreciation for those that do it well! But we can learn! And if we can be educated on something like jogging and running, that opens the door to learning about how to improve ourselves overall in terms of wellness.

If you’ve experience pain while running or are just interested, like myself, in what you can do to improve your running, Richelle is your girl!

Check out her page on Facebook, Running With Richelle here!

And don’t forget to follow  my page on Facebook as well! 



Stephanie Lanthier
RMT

Posted in #TrySomethingNew, Uncategorized by Pat Moore | Tags: , ,
November 29, 2019

Dr. Lovely here with a question for you.

Have you ever had one of these moments, where you bend down to pick something up, maybe a sock, or toy your kid has left on the floor, or perhaps had one of those epic sneezes and WHAMMO! Your life flashes before your eyes?? (OK, not really but kinda really!)

Most socks or sneezes, as far as I can tell, aren’t inherently evil and aren’t actively seeking to cause you pain. So, do you really think that the sock you picked up or that the sneeze were the cause?

I’m here to tell you that that is not the case!!!  As a chiropractor with 25 years of experience listening to patients stories, there’s not much that I haven’t heard or seen. And I’m willing to bet that you had signs and signals from your body well before that Mother Of All Sneezes!

Sometimes, we don’t listen to our bodies the way we should be. Instead of taking action to correct imbalances, postural habits etc. we’ll ignore aches and pains assuming they will go away. And many times they do! That’s because our bodies are very good at adapting to these things and moving on. The problem is that adapting is NOT the same as correcting!!

Our bodies can only adapt so many times before they actually start to break down.  Neglected for too long and all kinds of unpleasantness (Degeneration, disc bulge, inflammation etc.) can occur and then we have no choice but to deal with it. Best advice? Don’t wait until you’re in this situation. Pay attention to the warning signals your body provides! If you’re dealing with aches and pains, we can help you identify and and help you alleviate them. It’s so much easier to take care of small warnings before they become the drop you to your knees sneeze!!

Looking forward to meeting you!


Dr. Jennifer Lovely
Chiropractor

Posted in Chiropractic by Pat Moore | Tags: , , ,
November 6, 2019

Massage Therapy OttawaAre you feeling sluggish, perhaps run down? Is that seasonal slump hitting you? Yep, you guessed it.

Winter Is Coming

Self care is KEY during the winter season! Longer nights and shorter days means less vitamin D and sun rays.  At this time of year, it is crucial to step up our self care game, and I am here to help you take a step in the right direction!

One option for combating the SAD’s  (seasonal affective disorder) is meditation. 

We have 2 systems in our body: the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS). The SNS is our “flight or fight” system where we are constantly stimulated and always go go go. Where as our PNS is our “rest and digest”. When we find ourselves “stuck” in  fight or flight mode, this can put our systems in to a state overdrive or even burn out!  A lot of this can be attributed to SADS and seasonal stress!!  Meditation can certainly help calm an overly stimulated SNS system and with the longer nights and shorter days ahead, what better time than to take advantage of the darkness and meditate?! 

During the winter season things can get stressful!! Christmas is right around the corner and everyone is trying to meet deadlines for the new year. I also definitely don’t see anyone outside in the snow “catching rays”.

Start by taking 20 minutes out of your daily routine and try out some belly breathing exercises. TRY taking nice big deep belly breaths and focusing on inhaling for 3 seconds and exhaling for 3 seconds.

It doesn’t need to be fancy. Have a seat in a favorite chair, sit on the ground with your legs crossed or even lay down flat on a yoga mat. The idea is that you take time to relax and think inwards, focusing on what is going on in your body. Can you feel where you hold all your stress? Are you allowing your jaw to un-clench and eyebrows to relax? 

** Keep in mind – if you are resting your eyes, trying to meditate and all you can think of is the work that you haven’t finished, maybe meditation is not for you. 

If meditation is really not your cup of tea, booking  a massage is really the next best thing (who am I kidding… it’s definitely the best thing ever!)  Massage Therapy brings a multitude of benefits to your systems, but 3 key points that are crucial during this seasonal slump.

  • Massage increases your PNS, which is the “rest and digest” system. Aka the belly gurgles or falling asleep during your treatment. It allows you to feel more rested and turns off your sympathetic system that may always seem to be firing on all cylinders.  
  • Massage decreases levels of cortisol in the body. Bye bye stress! 
  • Massage increases the levels of dopamine and serotonin in the body. These neurotransmitters in the brain help balance your mood. OH HAPPY DAYS!!

Whether its at home or in a treatment room at Whole Therapy, these are all things our systems need during this gloomy time of the year. Self care allows us to stabilize, take a much needed deep breath, and balance our bodies to prevent imbalances such as burn out or seasonal slumps. Try it out at home with some meditation or stretching and if it’s not cutting it, come on in and book a massage. It’s time to take care of our bodies, as we only have one to live in.


Stephanie Lanthier
RMT

 

November 6, 2019

 

One day a client came to see me with severe anxiety and dread about an upcoming hospital procedure. Ninety minutes later, he reported the anxiety and dread were totally gone. It just wasn’t an issue anymore. So what happened? EFT allows the conscious and subconscious mind to collaborate in re-examining our sense of safety or lack of same.

Every fear is rooted in subconscious programming. The subconscious mind processes 1,000,000 times as much data every second as the conscious mind; and it’s been doing this since birth. Every word, body language, tone of voice, sound, light, touch,  goes into creating our assumptions about the world; our core beliefs. These are primarily laid down by the age of six and from that point on, every life event is viewed though those sets of lenses. Medicine now understands that “ACE’s or Adverse Childhood Events have a tremendous influence over both physical and emotional health for our entire lives; unless we change the programming.

 

Emotional Freedom Technique

 

Emotional Freedom Techniques (Tapping/Energy Psychology), Picture Tapping Techniques and Energy Medicine are all tools which allow the adult conscious mind to safely collaborate with the subconscious mind to determine the “whole story” at that present point in time. It’s a collaboration, not a fight. It’s estimated 95% of all thoughts, beliefs and assumptions are heavily influenced by the subconscious and its programming. When it comes to a fight, the subconscious always gets its way sooner or later.

So what about this particular client? What caused this degree of change?

After using effective techniques to bring body and mind come to a calmer and safer feeling state, we started breaking the fear and dread down into smaller pieces. No matter how huge or impossible an issue “feels”, it’s always made up of smaller manageable pieces.  At the start, the smallest piece he could identify was “feeling uncomfortable at the thought of this upcoming surgery” with a stated distress level of 8 out of 10 (8/10). After a couple of rounds of EFT, a more specific piece of the issue appeared at (9/10). Specifically, a nauseating anxiety in the stomach about waiting in the hall before going in for surgery.

Since memories and beliefs are stored in the body as well as the mind, including the physical sensations added a great deal of power to the following EFT round. On questioning, the distress level had dropped to 3/10 and was now about the anticipation about “going under” With one more round of Emotional Freedom Techniques, the distress level dropped to “0”. At this point he tried his best to bring back the anxiety, but still he felt fine.

As a final test to ensure all the roots of his anxiety had been addressed, he began describing a forward looking movie about the upcoming medical procedure to see if there were any points not yet fully addressed. Even then, no anxiety re-appeared. He’d set himself free.

If you or someone you care about is feeling stuck, or can’t get past a hurtful experience, book an initial interview with David Gilbert, our Integrative Therapist @ 613-747-5458 to explore opening the door to “emotional freedom.”


Author: David E P Gilbert. David is a highly experienced Integrative Therapist particularly focused on anxiety/depression, stress, burnout, grief, trauma or PTSD, Post Concussion Syndrome and self-sabotage.  Being trained in a number of modalities including Emotional Freedom Techniques and PTT (Picture Tapping Techniques), he works with clients both in-office and via phone or video cam across the world. Work so powerful it’s guaranteed. 

 

July 18, 2019

Hi ladies and gents, Cory here.

I’m happy to say that I’m now a fully certified Graston technique provider!  Some of you may be wondering..

What is The Graston Technique?

The Graston Technique was developed over 20 years ago when a patient was not satisfied with the rehabilitation regimen suggested to him following surgery.  Recovery was taking too long and was not providing him with the range of motion he was looking for. In search for a better option, he began researching and consulting with a number of medical industry professionals. Through this process, he established a set of stainless steel tools to help break down the scar tissue that was limiting his mobility. He created six different instruments, all uniquely designed for specific areas of the body to encourage faster and more effective healing. The techniques used to apply these tools promotes overall health and wellness, and is now known as The Graston Technique. It is an excellent, evidence-based, non-invasive healing method for those wishing to reduce acute, chronic, and post-surgical pain.

 

When you suffer from a strained muscle, or a pulled ligament or tendon, the soft tissues experience trauma. This can result in scar tissue developing around these structures, which then causes restrictions and reduced mobility as the surrounding fascia tightens up. Therefore, the focus of The Graston Technique is to break down this scar tissue and fascia and ultimately freeing everything up to move the way it was designed. When applied correctly, patients see a notable difference in reduced pain and increased function.

One of the unique elements of The Graston instruments is that they enhance the clinician’s ability to detect adhesions, scar tissue, and/or restrictions in the affected areas. An initial step to the technique is to run one of the tools over the area. During this process, it “catches” on fibrotic tissue. As the restricted areas immediately appear red in colour relative to the other surrounding areas, the practitioner knows that those areas are what need attention. Once the practitioner identifies the proper location, he/she uses the specific instrument(s) for that area to break up the scar tissue, which the body then absorbs. What makes The Graston Technique so effective is that it treats the area from multiple directions to accommodate for any irregular formation of scar tissue.  During this process, temporary inflammation in triggered, which is incredibly beneficial for the injury, as it increases the rate and amount of blood flow, and initiates the healing process of the affected tissues.  Therefore, when applied correctly, The Graston Technique promotes the body to heal itself.  So not only is it a fantastic treatment for decreasing pain and improving mobilization for acute and chronic muscle tightness, it also improves your range of motion and decreases delayed muscle soreness, making it the preferred treatment for many major sports teams.

 

As just mentioned, The Graston Technique can treat multiple types of pain, in both acute and chronic stages. Patients with the following diagnoses make excellent candidates for this type of treatment:

  • Tendinopathies (all the conditions that end in -osis or -itis, such as Achilles tendinitis, medial/lateral epicondylitis and greater trochanteric bursitis)
  • Fascial syndromes (such as trigger finger, plantar fasciitis, ITB syndrome)
  • Ligament pain syndromes (such as ankle sprains or other types of sprains)
  • Edema/swelling reduction
  • Post-surgical or traumatic scars/adhesions
  • Entrapment syndromes (carpal/tarsal tunnel, ulnar entrapment, thoracic outlet).

Benefits of The Graston Technique include:

  • Breaks up and releases any adhesions, resulting in decreased pain
  • Reduced scar tissue
  • Increased mobility
  • Decreased back & neck pain
  • Sports injury relief
  • Repetitive work injury relief
  • Decreases migraines & headaches

Possible risks and complications are quite minimal when using this technique, and the side effects generally only last for1-2 days, but most patients experience the following in the treated areas:

  • Bruising
  • Soreness
  • Redness

Over the 20 years since its discovery, The Graston Technique has become one of the most sought after treatments for all individuals. Regardless of the type and severity of the pain experienced, this approach is so effective that patients rarely walk away without noticing significant benefits. If pain is something you are currently experiencing, or have been experiencing for some time now, this treatment could be the answer you are looking for.

 

Cory Boyd, RMT
Graston Technique Provider

Posted in Massage Therapy by Cory Boyd | Tags: , ,
June 28, 2019

Have you ever considered run commuting? I started shortly after moving to Ottawa last summer and am hooked! Here are my top 5 reasons to consider running to and/or from work:

1. Beat the traffic! I don’t know how many times over the past 9 months I have actually ran past backed up vehicles who are slowly crawling along.

2. If you have a desk job like most people do, this is a fantastic way to start and/or finish your day! If you are sitting for 8 hours/day at work it’s great if you can avoid spending even more time sitting in a car to get to and from your job.

3. It’s cheap! Because I run to work our family only needs one vehicle. We also save money on gas every time I run in. And with regards to equipment all you need is a comfortable pair of running shoes and a running back pack.

4. You get to spend time outside breathing in the fresh air! I’m in an office building all day long so I love my commute in where I get to be outside, whether it’s a beautiful sunny day, raining or even snowing. It’s just nice to get out!

5. You can get your daily exercise in without having to find or make time early in the morning or in the evening after work. This is definitely the main reason I run commute! I have a toddler at home so when I get off I like to spend my evenings with her. Then when she goes to bed I’m usually in lazy mode and I don’t have the motivation to grab my running shoes and head outside. I get my workout in as part of my daily routine which means I don’t have to make time for it later. (I also don’t have the chance to make excuses for all the reasons I can’t run if it’s my mode of transportation!)

And if you start run commuting why stop there? If you forgot something at the grocery store and it’s within your running distance why not strap on your backpack and run there? It’s nice to make running a part of your lifestyle!

June 27, 2019

Hi! My name is Dylan and I’m addicted to school.  Ok not really, but I did recently graduate from my third post-secondary institution. Apart from gaining two degrees and an advanced diploma, I’ve gained a lot of knowledge along the way.

Johnston Hall – University of Guelph

I attended the University of Guelph, where I completed my B.Sc in Human Kinetics. There, I learned about the human body and had the opportunity to study in the cadaver lab, giving me a real-life glimpse of the human body and the ability to actually SEE what the muscles are doing during movement. I also learned that I LOVED physics. Imagine my surprise when I found out biomechanics was a thing and it was essentially physics for the human body!! I also wanted to give back to the community, so I became a volunteer exercise assistant at a health centre, where I assisted with exercises for older adults. Moreover, during my last year at Guelph, I did a fourth-year project where I researched fall prevention and older adults. My volunteering and my project fueled my passion for research and hands-on learning even more.

After my four years in Guelph, I wanted to research some more into the world of biomechanics. The next stop on my educational journey was completing my M. Sc at the University of Ottawa.  My research was focused on looking at older adults and how they adjust to sit-to-stands at varying levels of fatigue. But I learned so much more than that. During my time at U of O, I learned perseverance, accountability and initiative. I preserved from writing through all the different edits of my thesis, I was held accountable for my research when it was not going as planned, and I took initiative to reach out and contact those who could help me. I may have gained a degree from that school, but more importantly, I grew as a person there. And I discovered, post-graduate degrees were not for me. To my family’s relief, I was not planning on doing my PhD- Thanks to all my family and friends that I made walk up 7 plus flights of stairs to make my thesis happen!

Apart from completing my Masters, I believed it was a good idea to become a Registered Kinesiologist (R. Kin.) as well. So, I spent one winter studying for the registration exam, reading endless textbooks and memorizing the attachment points of muscles – Again!  I became a R. Kin. in the summer of 2015 and was lucky enough to have found a job working as one!  In that role, I was able to use my research in a practical setting. I was able to help people pre and post orthopaedic surgery, help patients manage pain, and help decrease arthritic flare-ups, all through the power of movement and exercise! Helping these patients, just through exercise, made me want to do more and that’s when I went back to school, for the third time, to become a Registered Massage Therapist.

I  have recently graduated from Algonquin College in the Massage therapy program, and the things I learned there were amazing. Apart from learning how to massage, I learned time management skills and the importance of maintaining boundaries. I learned that college was a different kind of hard. Almost like a fun challenge that made you also want to pull all your hair out.  Maybe most importantly, I learned  that I was going down the correct career path and I’m ecstatic on how well massage compliments my skills as a kinesiologist.

So, what does this all mean? Whole Therapy is lucky to have gained a (soon-to-be) RMT and a Registered Kinesiologist, who has years of experience in the fields of movement and exercise. Not only will my RMT touch help to ease pain and increase range of motion of a joint, but my R. Kin. eyes will be able to look at your movements as a human being and come close to pin pointing what needs to be worked on.

 

My name is Dylan, and I’m a life-long learner and a two-for-one therapist.

Dylan Crake
Registered Kinesiologist
and soon to be Registered Massage Therapist!

March 13, 2019

When spring hits after the freezing cold weather of winter, a big realization sets in. The perfect swing you mastered from last summer has left you once again. As you rotate through the changing seasons, this becomes an unfortunate reality every year, leaving you to start from the beginning as each golf season commences. It leaves you wondering whether you can do something to avoid being stuck in this continuous pattern, and improve every year rather than breaking even. Well guess what, the answer is YES!

 

To be well prepared upon return of the off-season, it is important to take care of your physical self. Training year round is critical for golfers to identify and correct any physical limitations, thus developing a solid foundation of mobility and stability.  This is necessary for optimum strength, which reflects in improved speed and power. Being physically prepared will allow you to play the most consistent, enjoyable, injury-free golf of your life.

Given that the golf swing requires a unique combination of motions, keeping flexibility and strength over the winter can be the key to a good start when golf season returns. Unfortunately, all too often there is a lack of activity and mobility during winter, which results in reduced range of motion/fluidity in your swing, and decreased strength. Therefore, it is pertinent to have a game plan to ensure that both these factors remain in place. A regular routine consisting of massage therapy and exercise is critical to maintaining consistency in your game. When appropriate massage therapy is applied, there is the obvious effect of relaxed muscles and improved flexibility/fluidity. However, the benefits extend much further and include enhanced golf performance, eliminating pain, reduced risk of injury, and more efficient/accelerated recovery from activity and/or injury. Combining massage therapy with a proper exercise program provides the strength, stability, and power required to not only maintain, but improve your performance as well. Without a doubt, both practices are critical to returning to the course in April with your best foot forward as opposed to rebuilding your swing all over again.

As previously mentioned, the game of golf is highly complex, involving significant strategy, skill, and technique. Therefore, reviewing, analyzing, changing, and practicing your set-up (grip, stance, posture, ball position and alignment) is just as important. Unfortunately, too many golfers fail to address the off-season as a time of growth and development, and fall into the same trap of inactivity and lack of practice. To avoid finding yourself in this category, focus on one or two key improvement priorities that are most likely to help you return to the course in spring with more skill and confidence. The following are common issues affecting a golfer’s game that one should keep in mind for practice during downtime:

  1. Poor golf posture: A proper golf posture is the foundation for a consistent and powerful golf swing. Without proper physical preparation (i.e. strength and stability), maintaining a proper golf posture is difficult.

 

  1. Stiffness, immobility and/ or pain in the golf swing: People most often neglect and/or do not fully address this limitation during the off-season. As a result, this lack of flexibility and reduced range of motion is the primary cause of golf-related injuries early in the season.  The golf swing is a very dynamic and complex movement that can put a great deal of strain on the body if not properly prepared.

 

  1. Early fatigue: If you walk the course, golf rounds can last up to 5 hours.  Without adequate endurance, early fatigue can lead to poor performance, frustration, additional injuries from lack of form, and overall lack of enjoyment.

 

As you can see, the off-season is the ideal time to make positive changes to your game through the maintenance/improvement of flexibility, strength, and stamina, as well as the progression and enhancement of your skills to ensure your return to the game is enjoyable, rewarding, and leaves you excited about your performance.

 

Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions or thoughts!  I look forward to hearing from you soon!

Cory Boyd
Registered Massage Therapist
Personal Trainer
Certified Golf Fitness Instructor

 

Posted in Massage Therapy, Uncategorized, Wellness by Pat Moore | Tags: , , ,
March 12, 2019

Happiness doesn’t happen by accident. They say we are in charge of how we feel, and I believe it, even though during some of my lower moments I’d like someone else to blame. I’m 35 days into a personal project on happiness, and I’m already living proof that we can choose to be happy or sad.

Life happens all around us and we can’t control most of it. In fact, the general consensus is that about 90% of what happens to us is beyond our personal control. So how do we maintain composure when someone rear-ends our car? Or a snowstorm derails our plans? Or our toddler spills our coffee all over aisle 3 of the grocery store?

Your Subconscious is Listening

Studies show that what we tell ourselves, we believe. Most of our thoughts are pre-programmed, with only about 5% of our thoughts being conscious. And unfortunately, most of our programming leans toward a negative bias. If you struggle with positive thoughts now, it’s likely you’re going to keep struggling with them.

This winter, I was struggling hard with keeping upbeat. The weather was oppressive. I have a lot of kids, and a business, and a small house (you get the idea). I needed a new focus, and a better coping strategy than simply counting the days until spring.

The solution is re-programming the subconscious. The way to do it? Repetition.

It’s easy to repeat negative things to ourselves. Positive things sometimes take more effort (and if we’re honest, they often don’t feel 100% true), but the subconscious is listening.

A Positive Challenge

Enter #100happydays. I first stumbled across this project in 2015, and I gave it a try. The idea was to post a picture of something that made you happy every day for 100 days in a row. It was brilliant, and I loved the experience. I opted to try it again, with a few rules:

 

  1. Minimize the ‘stuff’, maximize the feelings. It’s really easy to focus on an object or material thing and say that it makes us happy. Instead, I wanted to focus on the little things, experiences and nuances of my day. I felt it would create a richer experience.
  2. Be true. Whatever I posted about had to genuinely make me smile, laugh, or warm me up inside. No fake stuff.

 

And that’s it! It’s been 35 days so far and I’m loving the experience. Stay tuned for another update soon, but in the meantime, please feel free to follow my happy days on Instagram @wholetherapyjen

I’m also challenging each of you to pursue your own happiness!  Share your warm and fuzzies with us on Instagram @WholeTherapyOttawa

January 29, 2019

 

You know what’s the worst?

Pain along the shin that is caused by inflammation of the muscles that attach to the shin bone (aka the tibia).

Shin splints. Thy name is evil.

There are 2 types of shin splints as seen in the picture below. Pain along the outer front portion of the lower leg is called anterior shin splints. Pain along the back inside of the lower leg is called posterior shin splints. (or, posterior evil)

Common Causes:

Shin splints is an overuse injury that typically is caused by training errors such as such as increasing running distance or intensity too aggressively and changing to a hard or uneven training surface. Other causes include:

  • Poor running mechanics; heel striking.
  • Poor footwear. Sometimes people switch to minimalist footwear but if they are heel striking they can develop shin splints.
  • Weakness in the shin muscles; in particular tibialis anterior and tibialis posterior.
  • Core and pelvic muscle instability.
  • Imbalance between the quads and hamstrings with respect to strength and flexibility.
  • Foot arch abnormalities such as excessive pronation.
  • Poor intrinsic foot muscle strength.
  • Unequal leg length.

 

Treatment:

  • Rest! It is very difficult to resolve shin splints without temporarily taking a break from running. A rest break does not mean you cannot cross train to maintain your cardiovascular fitness! Try swimming, cycling, yoga or weight training. Any exercise that does not aggravate your shin splints.
  • Progress Slowly. Think of any training errors you may have made. When you start running again, make sure you do not make the same mistakes again. You may need a more gradual progression into distance or speed.
  • Mid-foot Strike. Do you heel strike? If so focus on mid-foot striking to decrease the force through your shins with each stride. The best way to do this is to focus on a 180 cadence (See earlier blog post on cadence!)
  • Footwear. Have a look at your footwear. If your sneakers are extremely worn or too big look at purchasing new ones. If you are in a more minimalist shoe you may need to switch to one with more cushioning temporarily.
  • Warm up. Do a proper warm up before your run starts, especially if you are doing a quality run such as hill training or speed work.
  • Strengthen your shins. Strengthen your tibialis anterior! Try toe walking or doing dorsiflexion with a resistance band.
  • Roll. Try rolling your shin muscle out. (Not the bone: ouch!) You don’t need to buy a fancy tiger tail as shown in the picture below. A wooden rolling pin from your kitchen works perfectly!
  • Figure out your muscle imbalances. Book an assessment with our physiotherapists to check for muscle imbalances. It is hard to know if you need your core, pelvis, thigh, shin, and/or foot muscles strengthened or stretched  if you don’t get a one on one assessment first!
  • Modalities. Your physiotherapist can also try acupuncture and/or taping to help resolve your pain faster.

Hopefully following some of these tips will help resolve your shin splints!  As always, if you have any questions or to book your assessment, email me anytime at richelle.wholetherapy@gmail.com

🙂

Posted in Blog by Pat Moore | Tags: , , ,