Tag: Ottawa

July 18, 2019

Hi ladies and gents, Cory here.

I’m happy to say that I’m now a fully certified Graston technique provider!  Some of you may be wondering..

What is The Graston Technique?

The Graston Technique was developed over 20 years ago when a patient was not satisfied with the rehabilitation regimen suggested to him following surgery.  Recovery was taking too long and was not providing him with the range of motion he was looking for. In search for a better option, he began researching and consulting with a number of medical industry professionals. Through this process, he established a set of stainless steel tools to help break down the scar tissue that was limiting his mobility. He created six different instruments, all uniquely designed for specific areas of the body to encourage faster and more effective healing. The techniques used to apply these tools promotes overall health and wellness, and is now known as The Graston Technique. It is an excellent, evidence-based, non-invasive healing method for those wishing to reduce acute, chronic, and post-surgical pain.

 

When you suffer from a strained muscle, or a pulled ligament or tendon, the soft tissues experience trauma. This can result in scar tissue developing around these structures, which then causes restrictions and reduced mobility as the surrounding fascia tightens up. Therefore, the focus of The Graston Technique is to break down this scar tissue and fascia and ultimately freeing everything up to move the way it was designed. When applied correctly, patients see a notable difference in reduced pain and increased function.

One of the unique elements of The Graston instruments is that they enhance the clinician’s ability to detect adhesions, scar tissue, and/or restrictions in the affected areas. An initial step to the technique is to run one of the tools over the area. During this process, it “catches” on fibrotic tissue. As the restricted areas immediately appear red in colour relative to the other surrounding areas, the practitioner knows that those areas are what need attention. Once the practitioner identifies the proper location, he/she uses the specific instrument(s) for that area to break up the scar tissue, which the body then absorbs. What makes The Graston Technique so effective is that it treats the area from multiple directions to accommodate for any irregular formation of scar tissue.  During this process, temporary inflammation in triggered, which is incredibly beneficial for the injury, as it increases the rate and amount of blood flow, and initiates the healing process of the affected tissues.  Therefore, when applied correctly, The Graston Technique promotes the body to heal itself.  So not only is it a fantastic treatment for decreasing pain and improving mobilization for acute and chronic muscle tightness, it also improves your range of motion and decreases delayed muscle soreness, making it the preferred treatment for many major sports teams.

 

As just mentioned, The Graston Technique can treat multiple types of pain, in both acute and chronic stages. Patients with the following diagnoses make excellent candidates for this type of treatment:

  • Tendinopathies (all the conditions that end in -osis or -itis, such as Achilles tendinitis, medial/lateral epicondylitis and greater trochanteric bursitis)
  • Fascial syndromes (such as trigger finger, plantar fasciitis, ITB syndrome)
  • Ligament pain syndromes (such as ankle sprains or other types of sprains)
  • Edema/swelling reduction
  • Post-surgical or traumatic scars/adhesions
  • Entrapment syndromes (carpal/tarsal tunnel, ulnar entrapment, thoracic outlet).

Benefits of The Graston Technique include:

  • Breaks up and releases any adhesions, resulting in decreased pain
  • Reduced scar tissue
  • Increased mobility
  • Decreased back & neck pain
  • Sports injury relief
  • Repetitive work injury relief
  • Decreases migraines & headaches

Possible risks and complications are quite minimal when using this technique, and the side effects generally only last for1-2 days, but most patients experience the following in the treated areas:

  • Bruising
  • Soreness
  • Redness

Over the 20 years since its discovery, The Graston Technique has become one of the most sought after treatments for all individuals. Regardless of the type and severity of the pain experienced, this approach is so effective that patients rarely walk away without noticing significant benefits. If pain is something you are currently experiencing, or have been experiencing for some time now, this treatment could be the answer you are looking for.

 

Cory Boyd, RMT
Graston Technique Provider

Posted in Massage Therapy by Cory Boyd | Tags: , ,
June 28, 2019

Have you ever considered run commuting? I started shortly after moving to Ottawa last summer and am hooked! Here are my top 5 reasons to consider running to and/or from work:

1. Beat the traffic! I don’t know how many times over the past 9 months I have actually ran past backed up vehicles who are slowly crawling along.

2. If you have a desk job like most people do, this is a fantastic way to start and/or finish your day! If you are sitting for 8 hours/day at work it’s great if you can avoid spending even more time sitting in a car to get to and from your job.

3. It’s cheap! Because I run to work our family only needs one vehicle. We also save money on gas every time I run in. And with regards to equipment all you need is a comfortable pair of running shoes and a running back pack.

4. You get to spend time outside breathing in the fresh air! I’m in an office building all day long so I love my commute in where I get to be outside, whether it’s a beautiful sunny day, raining or even snowing. It’s just nice to get out!

5. You can get your daily exercise in without having to find or make time early in the morning or in the evening after work. This is definitely the main reason I run commute! I have a toddler at home so when I get off I like to spend my evenings with her. Then when she goes to bed I’m usually in lazy mode and I don’t have the motivation to grab my running shoes and head outside. I get my workout in as part of my daily routine which means I don’t have to make time for it later. (I also don’t have the chance to make excuses for all the reasons I can’t run if it’s my mode of transportation!)

And if you start run commuting why stop there? If you forgot something at the grocery store and it’s within your running distance why not strap on your backpack and run there? It’s nice to make running a part of your lifestyle!

June 27, 2019

Hi! My name is Dylan and I’m addicted to school.  Ok not really, but I did recently graduate from my third post-secondary institution. Apart from gaining two degrees and an advanced diploma, I’ve gained a lot of knowledge along the way.

Johnston Hall – University of Guelph

I attended the University of Guelph, where I completed my B.Sc in Human Kinetics. There, I learned about the human body and had the opportunity to study in the cadaver lab, giving me a real-life glimpse of the human body and the ability to actually SEE what the muscles are doing during movement. I also learned that I LOVED physics. Imagine my surprise when I found out biomechanics was a thing and it was essentially physics for the human body!! I also wanted to give back to the community, so I became a volunteer exercise assistant at a health centre, where I assisted with exercises for older adults. Moreover, during my last year at Guelph, I did a fourth-year project where I researched fall prevention and older adults. My volunteering and my project fueled my passion for research and hands-on learning even more.

After my four years in Guelph, I wanted to research some more into the world of biomechanics. The next stop on my educational journey was completing my M. Sc at the University of Ottawa.  My research was focused on looking at older adults and how they adjust to sit-to-stands at varying levels of fatigue. But I learned so much more than that. During my time at U of O, I learned perseverance, accountability and initiative. I preserved from writing through all the different edits of my thesis, I was held accountable for my research when it was not going as planned, and I took initiative to reach out and contact those who could help me. I may have gained a degree from that school, but more importantly, I grew as a person there. And I discovered, post-graduate degrees were not for me. To my family’s relief, I was not planning on doing my PhD- Thanks to all my family and friends that I made walk up 7 plus flights of stairs to make my thesis happen!

Apart from completing my Masters, I believed it was a good idea to become a Registered Kinesiologist (R. Kin.) as well. So, I spent one winter studying for the registration exam, reading endless textbooks and memorizing the attachment points of muscles – Again!  I became a R. Kin. in the summer of 2015 and was lucky enough to have found a job working as one!  In that role, I was able to use my research in a practical setting. I was able to help people pre and post orthopaedic surgery, help patients manage pain, and help decrease arthritic flare-ups, all through the power of movement and exercise! Helping these patients, just through exercise, made me want to do more and that’s when I went back to school, for the third time, to become a Registered Massage Therapist.

I  have recently graduated from Algonquin College in the Massage therapy program, and the things I learned there were amazing. Apart from learning how to massage, I learned time management skills and the importance of maintaining boundaries. I learned that college was a different kind of hard. Almost like a fun challenge that made you also want to pull all your hair out.  Maybe most importantly, I learned  that I was going down the correct career path and I’m ecstatic on how well massage compliments my skills as a kinesiologist.

So, what does this all mean? Whole Therapy is lucky to have gained a (soon-to-be) RMT and a Registered Kinesiologist, who has years of experience in the fields of movement and exercise. Not only will my RMT touch help to ease pain and increase range of motion of a joint, but my R. Kin. eyes will be able to look at your movements as a human being and come close to pin pointing what needs to be worked on.

 

My name is Dylan, and I’m a life-long learner and a two-for-one therapist.

Dylan Crake
Registered Kinesiologist
and soon to be Registered Massage Therapist!

March 13, 2019

When spring hits after the freezing cold weather of winter, a big realization sets in. The perfect swing you mastered from last summer has left you once again. As you rotate through the changing seasons, this becomes an unfortunate reality every year, leaving you to start from the beginning as each golf season commences. It leaves you wondering whether you can do something to avoid being stuck in this continuous pattern, and improve every year rather than breaking even. Well guess what, the answer is YES!

 

To be well prepared upon return of the off-season, it is important to take care of your physical self. Training year round is critical for golfers to identify and correct any physical limitations, thus developing a solid foundation of mobility and stability.  This is necessary for optimum strength, which reflects in improved speed and power. Being physically prepared will allow you to play the most consistent, enjoyable, injury-free golf of your life.

Given that the golf swing requires a unique combination of motions, keeping flexibility and strength over the winter can be the key to a good start when golf season returns. Unfortunately, all too often there is a lack of activity and mobility during winter, which results in reduced range of motion/fluidity in your swing, and decreased strength. Therefore, it is pertinent to have a game plan to ensure that both these factors remain in place. A regular routine consisting of massage therapy and exercise is critical to maintaining consistency in your game. When appropriate massage therapy is applied, there is the obvious effect of relaxed muscles and improved flexibility/fluidity. However, the benefits extend much further and include enhanced golf performance, eliminating pain, reduced risk of injury, and more efficient/accelerated recovery from activity and/or injury. Combining massage therapy with a proper exercise program provides the strength, stability, and power required to not only maintain, but improve your performance as well. Without a doubt, both practices are critical to returning to the course in April with your best foot forward as opposed to rebuilding your swing all over again.

As previously mentioned, the game of golf is highly complex, involving significant strategy, skill, and technique. Therefore, reviewing, analyzing, changing, and practicing your set-up (grip, stance, posture, ball position and alignment) is just as important. Unfortunately, too many golfers fail to address the off-season as a time of growth and development, and fall into the same trap of inactivity and lack of practice. To avoid finding yourself in this category, focus on one or two key improvement priorities that are most likely to help you return to the course in spring with more skill and confidence. The following are common issues affecting a golfer’s game that one should keep in mind for practice during downtime:

  1. Poor golf posture: A proper golf posture is the foundation for a consistent and powerful golf swing. Without proper physical preparation (i.e. strength and stability), maintaining a proper golf posture is difficult.

 

  1. Stiffness, immobility and/ or pain in the golf swing: People most often neglect and/or do not fully address this limitation during the off-season. As a result, this lack of flexibility and reduced range of motion is the primary cause of golf-related injuries early in the season.  The golf swing is a very dynamic and complex movement that can put a great deal of strain on the body if not properly prepared.

 

  1. Early fatigue: If you walk the course, golf rounds can last up to 5 hours.  Without adequate endurance, early fatigue can lead to poor performance, frustration, additional injuries from lack of form, and overall lack of enjoyment.

 

As you can see, the off-season is the ideal time to make positive changes to your game through the maintenance/improvement of flexibility, strength, and stamina, as well as the progression and enhancement of your skills to ensure your return to the game is enjoyable, rewarding, and leaves you excited about your performance.

 

Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions or thoughts!  I look forward to hearing from you soon!

Cory Boyd
Registered Massage Therapist
Personal Trainer
Certified Golf Fitness Instructor

 

Posted in Massage Therapy, Uncategorized, Wellness by Pat Moore | Tags: , , ,
March 12, 2019

Happiness doesn’t happen by accident. They say we are in charge of how we feel, and I believe it, even though during some of my lower moments I’d like someone else to blame. I’m 35 days into a personal project on happiness, and I’m already living proof that we can choose to be happy or sad.

Life happens all around us and we can’t control most of it. In fact, the general consensus is that about 90% of what happens to us is beyond our personal control. So how do we maintain composure when someone rear-ends our car? Or a snowstorm derails our plans? Or our toddler spills our coffee all over aisle 3 of the grocery store?

Your Subconscious is Listening

Studies show that what we tell ourselves, we believe. Most of our thoughts are pre-programmed, with only about 5% of our thoughts being conscious. And unfortunately, most of our programming leans toward a negative bias. If you struggle with positive thoughts now, it’s likely you’re going to keep struggling with them.

This winter, I was struggling hard with keeping upbeat. The weather was oppressive. I have a lot of kids, and a business, and a small house (you get the idea). I needed a new focus, and a better coping strategy than simply counting the days until spring.

The solution is re-programming the subconscious. The way to do it? Repetition.

It’s easy to repeat negative things to ourselves. Positive things sometimes take more effort (and if we’re honest, they often don’t feel 100% true), but the subconscious is listening.

A Positive Challenge

Enter #100happydays. I first stumbled across this project in 2015, and I gave it a try. The idea was to post a picture of something that made you happy every day for 100 days in a row. It was brilliant, and I loved the experience. I opted to try it again, with a few rules:

 

  1. Minimize the ‘stuff’, maximize the feelings. It’s really easy to focus on an object or material thing and say that it makes us happy. Instead, I wanted to focus on the little things, experiences and nuances of my day. I felt it would create a richer experience.
  2. Be true. Whatever I posted about had to genuinely make me smile, laugh, or warm me up inside. No fake stuff.

 

And that’s it! It’s been 35 days so far and I’m loving the experience. Stay tuned for another update soon, but in the meantime, please feel free to follow my happy days on Instagram @wholetherapyjen

I’m also challenging each of you to pursue your own happiness!  Share your warm and fuzzies with us on Instagram @WholeTherapyOttawa

January 29, 2019

 

You know what’s the worst?

Pain along the shin that is caused by inflammation of the muscles that attach to the shin bone (aka the tibia).

Shin splints. Thy name is evil.

There are 2 types of shin splints as seen in the picture below. Pain along the outer front portion of the lower leg is called anterior shin splints. Pain along the back inside of the lower leg is called posterior shin splints. (or, posterior evil)

Common Causes:

Shin splints is an overuse injury that typically is caused by training errors such as such as increasing running distance or intensity too aggressively and changing to a hard or uneven training surface. Other causes include:

  • Poor running mechanics; heel striking.
  • Poor footwear. Sometimes people switch to minimalist footwear but if they are heel striking they can develop shin splints.
  • Weakness in the shin muscles; in particular tibialis anterior and tibialis posterior.
  • Core and pelvic muscle instability.
  • Imbalance between the quads and hamstrings with respect to strength and flexibility.
  • Foot arch abnormalities such as excessive pronation.
  • Poor intrinsic foot muscle strength.
  • Unequal leg length.

 

Treatment:

  • Rest! It is very difficult to resolve shin splints without temporarily taking a break from running. A rest break does not mean you cannot cross train to maintain your cardiovascular fitness! Try swimming, cycling, yoga or weight training. Any exercise that does not aggravate your shin splints.
  • Progress Slowly. Think of any training errors you may have made. When you start running again, make sure you do not make the same mistakes again. You may need a more gradual progression into distance or speed.
  • Mid-foot Strike. Do you heel strike? If so focus on mid-foot striking to decrease the force through your shins with each stride. The best way to do this is to focus on a 180 cadence (See earlier blog post on cadence!)
  • Footwear. Have a look at your footwear. If your sneakers are extremely worn or too big look at purchasing new ones. If you are in a more minimalist shoe you may need to switch to one with more cushioning temporarily.
  • Warm up. Do a proper warm up before your run starts, especially if you are doing a quality run such as hill training or speed work.
  • Strengthen your shins. Strengthen your tibialis anterior! Try toe walking or doing dorsiflexion with a resistance band.
  • Roll. Try rolling your shin muscle out. (Not the bone: ouch!) You don’t need to buy a fancy tiger tail as shown in the picture below. A wooden rolling pin from your kitchen works perfectly!
  • Figure out your muscle imbalances. Book an assessment with our physiotherapists to check for muscle imbalances. It is hard to know if you need your core, pelvis, thigh, shin, and/or foot muscles strengthened or stretched  if you don’t get a one on one assessment first!
  • Modalities. Your physiotherapist can also try acupuncture and/or taping to help resolve your pain faster.

Hopefully following some of these tips will help resolve your shin splints!  As always, if you have any questions or to book your assessment, email me anytime at richelle.wholetherapy@gmail.com

🙂

Posted in Blog by Pat Moore | Tags: , , ,
November 30, 2018

Trying to motivate yourself to run throughout the winter months can be a struggle, but trying to stay injury free while you run throughout the winter months can be even more of a challenge! Check out these winter running tips that should help keep you running consistently all year long without pesky injuries slowing you down!

 

Temporarily reduce your weekly mileage with the first snowfall.

When you are running on snow as opposed to a hard, slip free surface you are using stabilizing muscles you haven’t used in a long time. This places you at increased risk of injury. Week 1 run 50% of your normal weekly mileage. Week 2 increase to 75%. By week 3 you should be able to return to your normal weekly mileage.

Avoid switching to the treadmill for 100% of your winter running.

First of all running on a flat uniform surface involves repeating the exact same movement over and over again which increases your risk of repetitive strain injuries like achilles tendonitis and plantar fasciitis.  Second of all when the snow melts and you switch back to running outdoors you will have to drastically decrease your mileage or you’ll risk injury. Running on the treadmill does not mimic running outside! The impact force from running outside is much greater than on the treadmill. Also on the treadmill you are trying to keep up with the track as it glides under your feet, whereas outside you actually have to propel yourself forward. It’s very different therefore your body needs to be allowed the time to adjust!

Make sure your important stabilizing muscles are strong!

Running on the snow and ice demands more muscle effort than running on the treadmill or outdoors on dry pavement. Especially from the glutes and core. (See previous glute strengthening blog!)

Wear the proper footwear!

Yaktrax

Either wear sneakers that are meant for winter running and have soles with studs or spikes, or purchase an ice traction device such as Yaktrax that fit over your sneakers.

Warm up!

Warming up is more important during the cold winter months. If you are standing in a parking lot waiting for others in your group to show and you are shivering and chilly, your muscles are tight and cold as you start to run which can put you at increased risk of injury. Jog on the spot, do high knees or bum kicks, or wait in your car with your heat blasting!

Ignore the pace on your watch!

Focus on effort level as opposed to pace if you are used to running with a running watch. You will run slower in the winter months. If you try to maintain the same pace you did on the clear dry pavement you could end up with an injury. Use the rate of perceived exertion scale. Perceived exertion is how hard you feel your body is working. These feelings are not objective like monitoring your heart rate, but they can give an estimate of your heart rate and your exercise intensity zone.

 

 

 

Try snowshoe running!

It’s a great way to get outdoors and enjoy the snow covered trails. You have to make some small technique adjustments such as running with a slightly wider stance and lifting your feet higher. This will challenge your hip abductors such as your glute med and min and your hip flexors so make sure you ease into snowshoe running gradually. It is much slower than road/trail running so don’t focus on pace. Again use the rate of perceived exertion scale above! Also, purchasing snowshoes that are designed for running such as the Atlas snowshoes shown below can definitely improve your comfort level and speed while snowshoe running.

 

November 15, 2018

Last week I discussed how much targeting my glutes has helped improve my running performance over the past 2 months. For those of you who have been wondering if your own glutes are up to par, here is a helpful follow up blog!

This is a great test for glute max strength so give it a try at home! You do not need any equipment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  •       Lie on the floor with your arms across your chest and feet shoulder width apart.
  •       Lift your bum off the floor so that you are only balancing on your shoulder blades and heels.
  •       Now try to lift your left leg! Can you do it? How long can you hold it for?
  •       Now try to lift your right leg! Can you do it? How long can you hold it for? Is it easier or harder than when you lifted your left leg?

For runners, asymmetry is not our friend! There are certain sports when muscle strength/flexibility asymmetry is normal and maybe even necessary to perform well (think golf/curling/baseball). But runners should be equally flexible and strong throughout the body. So if you do the above test and you find it more difficult to lift the left leg, your right glute needs some attention! And vice versa for the opposite side.  

Tune in next week for Part 3 where I’ll go over functional strengthening movements for runners!

November 12, 2018

 

The main goal of an initial assessment is to determine possible causes of your injury or impairment. We also ask: What can we do to remove or alleviate the pain?

One thing to keep in mind is that sometimes, you may be a bit sore after an assessment.  This is largely due to the fact that we’ve probably just moved your body in ways you’ve been avoiding due to discomfort or pain.  In order to determine a course of action, we as therapists trust in functional movement assessment techniques to help us get you back to the best version of yourselves as quickly as possible!

Physiotherapy Assessment

 

What to Expect

  • Our initial assessments typically consist of a 1 hour one-on-one session with a therapist, and 99 percent of the time, treatment will be provided on the first visit as well.

 

  • The therapist will review your health history as well as pose a series of helpful “red flag” questions with the purpose of eliminating any sinister causes as the root of your injury/impairment.

 

  • Expect to move!  Our bodies were designed to do so and chances are, you’re here to figure out what is keeping you from pain free movement.

 

  • It’s always a good idea to come dressed in non-restrictive clothing so that when a therapist is assessing your squat for example, you’re not going to be doing so in a suit or skirt.

 

  • If you have any diagnostic imaging available to you (x-ray, MRI), we will be happy to have a look at that with you.

 

  • Homework is probably going to be assigned.  Getting you back to feeling great will require your active participation and expectations will be set out for you by your therapist.  We are always available by phone or email if you ever have any questions or need clarification on what your homework is.

The initial assessment is the first step in getting you back in action.  Just remember, we want to see you as little as possible, but as much as necessary to get and keep you pain-free and functioning well.

November 8, 2018

2 months ago my husband and I made a very big move. We sold our home in Labrador, packed up our truck and our camper and hit the dirt road (literally) to move to Ottawa. I worked as a physiotherapist for 9 years at the hospital in Goose Bay, so accepting a job with Whole Therapy was a huge change for me. I was very nervous and excited and obviously was wondering if I had made the right decision.

Fast forward 2 months and I can say with absolute certainty that yes we made the right choice. My husband and I, along with our 14 month old daughter Emily, absolutely love Ottawa. We love to run, hike, cycle, canoe, and camp, so Ottawa has been a fantastic fit for us. But even more important is I love my new job. My coworkers are fantastic and have taught me so much in just a few weeks. I have met a lot of really cool clients and I love working with the team here to help people reach their goals as fast as possible.

One huge benefit to working at Whole Therapy is that the staff here not only work together to help each other’s clients but they also work together to help each other. I have been running competitively since I was in high school. Over the years I have completed 9 half marathons, 2 full marathons and a bunch of 5 and 10km races. Back home in Labrador I was a member of the Trappers’ Running Club Executive where I helped organize the annual Trapline Marathon (it’s a Boston qualifier and a fantastic race if anyone wants to experience a run in the rural north!) I helped organize and lead the running clinics for the Trapline and I offered education sessions on running form, injury prevention, stretching, etc.

So needless to say I am a runner and am very passionate about the sport. After moving to Ottawa I joined Run Ottawa and I immediately started exploring different running routes and trails around the city. I was having some persistent issues that seemed to start while I was running pregnant with my daughter in 2017. These issues particularly occurred during/after tempo runs, interval training or races:

  • Stitches under my ribs during my higher intensity training sessions that were just completely ruining my runs. Everything I did to stop them failed. I tried to eat at least 2-3 hours before running, do a good warm up, breathe deeply through the stitch. Nothing seemed to work.
  • My hamstrings were just destroyed after speed work. They were so tight, sore and stiff.
  • The area around my C-section scar just felt, for lack of a better word, ugly! Very achy and empty if that makes sense.

My first race in Ottawa was the 5km RBC Run for the Kids in the middle of September. I had a great race but again all 3 of the above issues definitely limited my pace. When I came to work that Monday and chatted to my co-workers about how the race went, I became the client instead of the therapist and it was awesome!

Jamie took me into the gym and focused on why my hamstrings were working so hard. Turns out my glute max was extremely weak especially on the left which meant my hamstrings had to work overtime to compensate. He gave me some homework which included single leg bridge reps, step downs and reverse plank on the stability ball with knee extension. He also worked on my breathing technique which he figured was the cause of my frequent running stitches.

Mel got her hands on me to work around my C-section scar. Emily is 14 months old so it has definitely healed, but I learned after that session that it was not so much the scar tissue causing the “ugly” sensation but the very tight hip musculature surrounding it.

My second race in Ottawa was the 10km Ottawa Fall Colors Run. I ran stitch free, I felt my glute max was definitely working harder than it had been a month ago which meant my hamstrings weren’t totally exhausted following, and I didn’t have the ugly C—section scar feeling!

I still have a lot of work to do over the winter months but I can say with confidence that I think I will be able to run some personal best times next year with the help of my fantastic coworkers!

If you are a runner and you want to run as efficiently as possible, the off season is coming up and it’s a great time to book an appointment and be assessed for any muscle imbalances you may have!

Posted in Physiotherapy by Pat Moore | Tags: , , ,